212 Ferguson Building • 336-256-1020 • gerontology.wp.uncg.edu

Administration
Rebecca G. Adams, Program Coordinator

About
The mission of the UNCG Gerontology Program is to teach, apply, and create gerontological knowledge through collaborative relationships with academic disciplines, community organizations, and businesses to enrich the lives of older adults and their families. Graduates are prepared to be leaders in the profession and to serve older adults locally and nationally through the health, business, non-profit, and academic sectors.

Graduate Programs

  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Gerontology, (16)
  • Master of Science in Gerontology, (31)
Professors

  • Rebecca G. Adams, Successful aging, aging music audiences, older adult friendship (Department of Sociology, Gerontology Program Coordinator).
  • Leandra Bedini, Therapeutic recreation services, family caregiving (Department of Community and Therapeutic Recreation).
  • James Eddy, Worksite health promotion; distance education; design, implementation, and evaluation of health education programs; health behavior theory (Department of Public Health Education).
  • Jennifer Etnier, Cognitive benefits of physical activity, exercise psychology, exercise and cognition, psychological benefits of exercise (Department of Kinesiology).
  • Laurie M. Kennedy-Malone, Primary care, advanced practice nursing, older adult care, gerontological nurse practitioners, medical evaluation in older adults (School of Nursing).
  • Susan Letvak, Workforce issues, aging RN, qualitative methods (School of Nursing).
  • Dan Perlman, Intimate relationships, aging, life course (Department of Human Development and Family Studies).
  • John Rife, Social and economic impacts of unemployment and income deficiency on older workers, families, and homeless (Department of Social Work).
  • Olav Rueppell, Social insects, life history tactics, behavioral development and aging (Department of Biology).
  • Dayna R. Touron, Cognitive functioning and skilled performance in older and younger adults, strategy use, skill learning, metacognition (Department of Psychology).
  • William L. Tullar, Aspects of management, human resource management and development (Department of Management).

Associate Professors

  • Gregory D. Carroll, Choral directing (School of Music).
  • Nancy Green, Technology and aging (Department of Computer Science).
  • William Karper, Physical Activity, health, older adults, chronic pail conditions (Department of Kinesiology).
  • Kristine Lundgren, Cognitive-linguistic disorders in adults with acquired traumatic brain injury and adults with right hemisphere damage (Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders).
  • Sudha Shreeniwas, Wellbeing and health over the life course in Asia and the U.S.; ethnicity, culture, and health among elderly persons worldwide (Department of Human Development and Family Studies).
  • Stephen Sills, Fair housing, community-engaged research, program evaluation, immigrant incorporation (Department of Sociology).
  • Patricia Sink, Music-related hearing loss, graduate music education (School of Music).

Assistant Professors

  • Jiyoung Hwang, Marketing to older consumers (Department of Marketing, Entrepreneurship, Hospitality & Tourism).
  • Deborah Lekan, Gerontology, cardiovascular, frailty and resilience, health disparities, literacy (School of Nursing).
  • Tamaki Onishi, Public affairs, nonprofit management (Department of Political Science).
  • Jay Poole, Identity, gender and sexuality, clinical social work practice, gerontology in social work practice (Department of Social Work).
  • Meredith Powers, Sustainable aging, ecological justice (Department of Social Work).

Clinical Professor

  • Jacqueline Kayler Debrew, Gerontological community practice (School of Nursing).

Gerontology, PBC, (16)

The Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Gerontology, offered as an online program, requires 16 semester hours that must be successfully completed during four academic years. Courses fulfilling the certificate program may be used to meet requirements in a degree program in accordance with the policies of the Graduate School.

Application and Admission
For information regarding deadlines and requirements for admission, please see the Guide to Graduate Admissions.

In addition to the application materials required by the Graduate School, applicants must submit a personal essay elaborating on their experience and/or interest in working with older adults.

Students wishing to pursue the certificate in gerontology while pursuing a graduate degree should consult with the Gerontology Coordinator and with the department of interest.

Certificate Requirements

Required Core Courses (10)
GRO 501 Seminar: Critical Issues of Aging (3)
GRO 600 Proseminar in Gerontology (1)
GRO 621 Health and Aging (3)
GRO 649 Gerontology Internship or Research Experience I (3)
GRO 501 and GRO 600 should be completed during the first academic year after acceptance to the certificate program.

Electives (6)
To meet the student’s educational objectives, two courses (6) are selected under advisement.

Gerontology, MS, (31)

The MS in Gerontology requires 31 semester hours of course work and internships or research experiences.

Application and Admission
For information regarding deadlines and requirements for admission, please see the Guide to Graduate Admissions.

In addition to the application materials required by The Graduate School, applicants must submit a personal essay elaborating on their experience and/or interest in working with older adults.

Degree Requirements

Required Core Courses (22)
GRO 501 Seminar: Critical Issues of Aging (3)
GRO 600 Proseminar in Gerontology (1)
KIN 601 Applying Research to Professional Practice (3)
or
HHS 625 Research Methods for Health and Human Sciences (3)
or
Equivalent under advisement
KIN 723 Statistical Methods for Kinesiology (3)
or
HEA 604 Public Health Statistics (3)
or
ERM 517 Statistical Methods in Education (3)
or
Equivalent under advisement
GRO 621 Health and Aging (3)
GRO 649 Gerontology Internship or Research Experience I (3)
GRO 651 Integrative Seminar in Gerontology (3)
GRO 679 Gerontology Internship or Research Experience II (3)
Note: GRO 651: Capstone Experience

Electives (9)
To meet the student’s educational objectives, nine (9) hours are selected under advisement.

GRO 501 Seminar: Critical Issues of Aging (3:3)
Intensive review and analysis of the literature and research on issues and unresolved problems of aging. Offered both face-to-face and online.
Offered
Fall

GRO 511 Silver Industries (3:3)
Overview of the longevity economy and its influence on entrepreneurial opportunities. Case illustrations highlighted. Using the entrepreneurial business model, student explore opportunities, risks, and rewards in silver industries market.

GRO 589 Experimental Course
This number reserved for experimental courses. Refer to the Course Schedule for current offerings.

GRO 600 Proseminar in Gerontology (1:1)
Introduction and gateway to the profession and study of gerontology including career roles and paths, professional development and ethics, and research processes and conduct.

GRO 601 Practical Issues in Aging (1:1)
Examination of a topic in aging from an applied perspective applicable to professionals working in the field of aging.
Notes
May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits when topic varies.

GRO 610 Life Planning for the Third Age (3:3)
Integrative approach to explore how trends in finances, relationships, health, self-development, housing and work/leisure time interact to impact quality of life and options available to aging adults.

GRO 611 Issues in Aging and Business

GRO 612 The Boomer Demographic Phenomena (3:3)
Overview of the current and future societal and demographic trends as a consequence of the Boomer Demographic Phenomena with implications for government, community, and business markets. Applied basic demographic exercises.

GRO 613 Workforce and Human Resource Policies for Aging Societies (3:3)
Examines how countries facing crises stemming from aging populations, retirement, and related economic factors address older worker concerns, employer policies and programs, and government intervention in workforce issues.

GRO 620 Research Methods in Gerontology (3:3)
The integration and application of qualitative and quantitative research designs and methods used in gerontology. Additional attention focuses on the formulation and writing of a research proposal.
Prerequisite
GRO 501 and permission of instructor

GRO 621 Health and Aging (3:3)
Examines aspects of health and aging from an integration of biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. Foundations for the professional practice of gerontology.

GRO 622 Financing Longevity: Topics in Insurance (3:3)
Overview of concepts and products of insurance related to financing longevity in the United States. Topics include Medicare, Medicaid, long term care insurance and related products.

GRO 631 Planning and Evaluation for Professionals in Aging (3:3)
Introduction to the knowledge and skills related to planning and evaluating innovative responses to the aging of society using program theory as a foundation.

GRO 632 Communities Responding to an Aging Society (3:3)
Addresses community responses to an aging society and how those responses may be enhanced through civic engagement, infrastructure development, and public/private initiatives. Emphasizes developing and sustaining innovative programs.

GRO 633 Long Term Care Public Policy (3:3)
Addresses public policy related to the organization, financing, and delivery of the broad continuum of long term care with a concentration on the care of frail older adults.

GRO 649 Gerontology Internship or Research Experience I (3:0:10–12)
First internship or research experience for graduate students in gerontology. 140 to 160 hours in a program approved site developed from among nonprofit, governmental, or business settings.
Prerequisite
GRO 501 and permission of instructor
Notes
Grade: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory, S/U.

GRO 651 Integrative Seminar in Gerontology (3:3)
Integration of current literature and theoretical applications in gerontology focusing on specific area(s) of student’s specialty and internship experiences. Additional emphasis on professional writing, presentations, networks, and extramural funding.
Prerequisite
Enrollment in the MS in gerontology program and completion of at least 24 hours of course work including: 501, 620, 649, ERM 517 or STA 571 (plus lab), and 12 hours of gerontology electives
Offered
Spring

GRO 676 Special Topics in Gerontology (1 or 3)
Study of a special topic in gerontology.
Notes
May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

GRO 677 Entrepreneurship Opportunities in Healthy Aging (3:3)
Examination of entrepreneurship opportunities related to the aging population, with specific attention to products and services that extend the healthy lifespan. Includes development of Business Opportunity Analysis.
Cross Listed Courses
ENT 677, KIN 677

GRO 679 Gerontology Internship or Research Experience II (3:0:12–15)
Final internship or research experience for graduate students in gerontology. 160 to 200 hours in a program approved site developed from among nonprofit, governmental, or business settings
Prerequisite
Admission to the MS in gerontology. Completion of at least 2/3 course work, including GRO 501, GRO 600, GRO 620, and GRO 649, CITI certification for social and behavioral sciences, and permission of instructor
Notes
Grade: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory, S/U.

GRO 695 Independent Study (1–3)
Intensive study in an area of special interest in gerontology.
Notes
May be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours credit.

GRO 711 Experimental Course
This number reserved for experimental courses. Refer to the Course Schedule for current offerings.