2021 Graduate Research & Creativity Expo

SHOWCASE OF SCHOLARSHIP

Congratulations to the winners of this year’s showcase. The following is a playlist of their videos, you can also view this playlist directly on YouTube. See below for a table of all participants from this year.

Use the box below to search the table, e.g. “Arts”, “Social Sciences”

CategoryPresenter First NamePresenter Last NameAcademic DepartmentFM TitleFM First NameFM Last NameAuthorsProject TitleVideoAbstractIRB#Program
ArtsCaitlynBaldwinTheatreProf.Deb L.BellJames WrenCreating Theatre in the Time of Covid-19https://youtu.be/BNo2jEtzLU0The theatrical industry does not look like it did just one year ago. With many added protocols we, in the School of Theatre, were able to safely navigate the production process for our fall shows and we continue to create this spring.

In June we began the design process for Jose Rivera’s play Marisol; our season opener. We met virtually via Zoom unsure of what the fall semester would look like once we returned to campus.

Covid-19 continues to shape theatre and a plethora of other industries. We have continued to practice our craft at a time when theatre is not happening in the ways that it always has. For many of us, we have been reminded why we do what we do. This digital story explores collaboration and the production process through a lens of gratitude, possibility and creating amidst the pandemic.
Caitlyn Baldwin
Theatre
In collaboration with: James Wren, Prof. Deb L. Bell
Creating Theatre in the Time of Covid-19

The theatrical industry does not look like it did just one year ago. With many added protocols we, in the School of Theatre, were able to safely navigate the production process for our fall shows and we continue to create this spring.

In June we began the design process for Jose Rivera’s play Marisol; our season opener. We met virtually via Zoom unsure of what the fall semester would look like once we returned to campus.

Covid-19 continues to shape theatre and a plethora of other industries. We have continued to practice our craft at a time when theatre is not happening in the ways that it always has. For many of us, we have been reminded why we do what we do. This digital story explores collaboration and the production process through a lens of gratitude, possibility and creating amidst the pandemic.
Advised by: Prof. Deb L. Bell
ArtsAllisonBeatyDanceDr.Ana PaulaHöflingDancing With My Grandfather: An Embodied Exploration of Oral Historyhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrsmxCFp-5gExploring the role of personal stories in the construction of history, I examine recollection of past memories through engagement with my grandfather’s past. Taking an intertwined methodological approach combining oral history with practice as research, I conduct oral history interviews with my grandfather, analyze writings from his autobiographical poetry book, and explore themes through my own embodiment in the dance studio. Through this approach, I investigate the implications of embodying another’s memories and the impact of sharing personal histories through a performance medium. In addition, I consider how the past is transformed by the ways in which we recall memories and the impact of shared personal narratives on our understanding of history.Allison Beaty
Dance
In collaboration with: Dr. Ana Paula Höfling
Dancing With My Grandfather: An Embodied Exploration of Oral History

Exploring the role of personal stories in the construction of history, I examine recollection of past memories through engagement with my grandfather’s past. Taking an intertwined methodological approach combining oral history with practice as research, I conduct oral history interviews with my grandfather, analyze writings from his autobiographical poetry book, and explore themes through my own embodiment in the dance studio. Through this approach, I investigate the implications of embodying another’s memories and the impact of sharing personal histories through a performance medium. In addition, I consider how the past is transformed by the ways in which we recall memories and the impact of shared personal narratives on our understanding of history.
Advised by: Dr. Ana Paula Höfling
ArtsPaigeBischlerInterior ArchitectureDr.Amanda J.GaleMultisensory Active Seating for Students with ADHD: The FlexiRockerhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAAgwQYRcdMAttention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) causes people to struggle with focusing on simple tasks or sitting still for extended periods of time. Because of this, active seating options have appeared in educational environments as physical movement triggers blood flow to the brain, which is needed for concentration. Therefore, a conceptual chair was designed to aid in distraction and hyperactive behaviors. The most common movements associated with ADHD are tapping of the foot or hand, swaying, or fidgeting. The design objective was to create a single piece of furniture for young adults that accommodated the three movements (rocking, bouncing, and tapping) most commonly used in individuals with ADHD. Some features of the chair that integrate multiple senses include a bungee seat to accommodate bouncing, curved legs that rock back-and-forth, and webbing for tactile stimulation.Paige Bischler
Interior Architecture
In collaboration with: Dr. Amanda J. Gale
Multisensory Active Seating for Students with ADHD: The FlexiRocker

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) causes people to struggle with focusing on simple tasks or sitting still for extended periods of time. Because of this, active seating options have appeared in educational environments as physical movement triggers blood flow to the brain, which is needed for concentration. Therefore, a conceptual chair was designed to aid in distraction and hyperactive behaviors. The most common movements associated with ADHD are tapping of the foot or hand, swaying, or fidgeting. The design objective was to create a single piece of furniture for young adults that accommodated the three movements (rocking, bouncing, and tapping) most commonly used in individuals with ADHD. Some features of the chair that integrate multiple senses include a bungee seat to accommodate bouncing, curved legs that rock back-and-forth, and webbing for tactile stimulation.
Advised by: Dr. Amanda J. Gale
ArtsCarolineDunmireMusic TheoryDr.GuyCapuzzoUsing Feminist Theory to Examine Musical Borrowing in the String Quartets of Caroline Shawhttps://youtu.be/xWHADhx2_WECaroline Shaw—the youngest female recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for Music—is fascinated with musical borrowing. This has influenced her acclaimed compositions which prominently feature reworking of existing music—both audibly and inaudibly. In “The Cutting Garden”, Shaw manipulates fragments from Ravel and Mozart. She stated, "[I]n making a cover. . .it's your own story that you're telling.” Female composers have often been called upon to prove themselves in a male-dominated field and Shaw satisfies those expectations without quelling her own objectives. I argue that the story Shaw tells through musical borrowing contributes to a longer story of creative women and their fight for equality, and that analysis of Shaw’s compositions brings forth bigger questions like what are the issues women in music face in the 21st century and what connection can be drawn to their uses of canonical materials in their music?Caroline Dunmire
Music Theory
In collaboration with: Dr. Guy Capuzzo
Using Feminist Theory to Examine Musical Borrowing in the String Quartets of Caroline Shaw

Caroline Shaw—the youngest female recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for Music—is fascinated with musical borrowing. This has influenced her acclaimed compositions which prominently feature reworking of existing music—both audibly and inaudibly. In “The Cutting Garden”, Shaw manipulates fragments from Ravel and Mozart. She stated, "[I]n making a cover. . .it's your own story that you're telling.” Female composers have often been called upon to prove themselves in a male-dominated field and Shaw satisfies those expectations without quelling her own objectives. I argue that the story Shaw tells through musical borrowing contributes to a longer story of creative women and their fight for equality, and that analysis of Shaw’s compositions brings forth bigger questions like what are the issues women in music face in the 21st century and what connection can be drawn to their uses of canonical materials in their music?
Advised by: Dr. Guy Capuzzo
ArtsChrisForrerDirecting (School of Theatre)Dr.JohnGulleyColor- and Gender-Conscious Casting for Janet Allard's "Incognito"https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9T6h509alU"JIM, 18 years old--played by 5 men. TILLY, 18 years old--played by 5 women." So reads the character description for "Incognito," a one-act play written by UNCG professor Janet Allard. With the playwright's blessing, directing this play offered an opportunity to employ color- and gender-conscious casting practices to assemble a diverse cast that represents the student body at the UNCG School of Theatre and also to reject the socially constructed categories of "race" and "gender" as they are applied in the American theatre.Chris Forrer
Directing (School of Theatre)
In collaboration with: Dr. John Gulley
Color- and Gender-Conscious Casting for Janet Allard's "Incognito"

"JIM, 18 years old--played by 5 men. TILLY, 18 years old--played by 5 women." So reads the character description for "Incognito," a one-act play written by UNCG professor Janet Allard. With the playwright's blessing, directing this play offered an opportunity to employ color- and gender-conscious casting practices to assemble a diverse cast that represents the student body at the UNCG School of Theatre and also to reject the socially constructed categories of "race" and "gender" as they are applied in the American theatre.
Advised by: Dr. John Gulley
ArtsDavidGarrettTheatreProf.Deb L.BellLighting and Costume Design for Skeleton Crewhttps://youtu.be/_EgH1Hjg8SYDominique Morisseau's Skeleton Crew explores the personal impact of the Detroit manufacturing collapse on the lives of union workers. A gritty, realistic play with touches of the surreal, Skeleton Crew presents many challenges for designers- the passing of time and the deterioration of economic status, personal expression within a work environment, and gender and class intersectionality within manufacturing industries. In addition, the safety protocols and procedures for producing live theatre during a pandemic place restrictions on nearly all of the usual systems and behaviors employed during performance. My presentation will explore the design process for Skeleton Crew from inception to the closing performance.David Garrett
Theatre
In collaboration with: Prof. Deb L. Bell
Lighting and Costume Design for Skeleton Crew

Dominique Morisseau's Skeleton Crew explores the personal impact of the Detroit manufacturing collapse on the lives of union workers. A gritty, realistic play with touches of the surreal, Skeleton Crew presents many challenges for designers- the passing of time and the deterioration of economic status, personal expression within a work environment, and gender and class intersectionality within manufacturing industries. In addition, the safety protocols and procedures for producing live theatre during a pandemic place restrictions on nearly all of the usual systems and behaviors employed during performance. My presentation will explore the design process for Skeleton Crew from inception to the closing performance.
Advised by: Prof. Deb L. Bell
ArtsCameronJohnInterior ArchitectureDr.Lucinda K.HavenhandDerek ToomesInteriority | Exploring Interior and Compositions of the Selfhttps://youtu.be/FZfemWmrsWEA presentation on the developing stages of a thesis examining interior space through a speculative lens; Internally discovering an exploratory design process through sketches, visual studies, and reflection.Cameron John
Interior Architecture
In collaboration with: Derek Toomes, Dr. Lucinda K. Havenhand
Interiority | Exploring Interior and Compositions of the Self

A presentation on the developing stages of a thesis examining interior space through a speculative lens; Internally discovering an exploratory design process through sketches, visual studies, and reflection.
Advised by: Dr. Lucinda K. Havenhand
ArtsHeatherLofdahlMusic EducationDr.Rebecca B.MacLeodTriston Broadway, Gabriel Figuracion, Damien Miles, Maguette SeyeCreating a Diverse Online Music Learning Community for Young Musicianshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSm8KCcpS4MThe demographics of public school students in the United States are becoming increasingly diverse. The teaching profession, specifically string teachers, has yet to reflect this diversity. Researchers have suggested that culturally responsive teaching and inclusion of same-race role models can positively impact students’ learning and motivation. Since most string teachers are White and female, one possible solution is to provide students with near-peer mentors who look like them. Our purpose was to create an online music learning community that includes diverse musical models for students from many cultural backgrounds. We created instructional videos featuring a diverse population of teachers and music, used these videos for instruction in our community partnerships, and made these videos available to string teachers around the world. This project was a collaborative effort among UNCG faculty, UNCG graduate and undergraduate students, and public school students who are members of the Peck Alumni Leadership Program.Heather Lofdahl
Music Education
In collaboration with: Triston Broadway, Gabriel Figuracion, Damien Miles, Maguette Seye, Dr. Rebecca B. MacLeod
Creating a Diverse Online Music Learning Community for Young Musicians

The demographics of public school students in the United States are becoming increasingly diverse. The teaching profession, specifically string teachers, has yet to reflect this diversity. Researchers have suggested that culturally responsive teaching and inclusion of same-race role models can positively impact students’ learning and motivation. Since most string teachers are White and female, one possible solution is to provide students with near-peer mentors who look like them. Our purpose was to create an online music learning community that includes diverse musical models for students from many cultural backgrounds. We created instructional videos featuring a diverse population of teachers and music, used these videos for instruction in our community partnerships, and made these videos available to string teachers around the world. This project was a collaborative effort among UNCG faculty, UNCG graduate and undergraduate students, and public school students who are members of the Peck Alumni Leadership Program.
Advised by: Dr. Rebecca B. MacLeod
ArtsRaminMahdizadeh SaberInterior ArchitectureProf.Travis LeeHicksAsha Kutty, Dan HalesComputer Visualization as an effective tool to overcome communication barriers among Non-profit stakeholdershttps://youtu.be/DThbHayYOnIThis study is focused on Computer visualization as one of the methods to help Non-profit organizations communicate more easily with audiences and present their objectives in a more clear language in an attempt to gather more financial and non-financial participation.Ramin Mahdizadeh Saber
Interior Architecture
In collaboration with: Asha Kutty, Dan Hales, Prof. Travis Lee Hicks
Computer Visualization as an effective tool to overcome communication barriers among Non-profit stakeholders

This study is focused on Computer visualization as one of the methods to help Non-profit organizations communicate more easily with audiences and present their objectives in a more clear language in an attempt to gather more financial and non-financial participation.
Advised by: Prof. Travis Lee Hicks
ArtsElenaMakarionEnglishDr.KarenWeylerToni Morrison and Performing Audiobooks: Teaching Audio Texts in the Classroomhttps://youtu.be/luGTQ9FZZ7QThis presentation looks at the potential of audiobooks for teaching fiction. Toni Morrison, and her performative readings of her own novels, will be the foci of this debate. While many scholars have objected to the use of audiobooks in the classroom, Toni Morrison, in interviews such as with Oprah Winfrey, discusses how audiobooks increase accessibility. Today’s shifting cultural needs, for students and popular audiences alike, demand a more flexible format for reading. Additionally, I will argue that audiobooks are not a “lazy” way to read novels, but rather that this form requires interpretative and analytical skills that should be taught in the classroom.Elena Makarion
English
In collaboration with: Dr. Karen Weyler
Toni Morrison and Performing Audiobooks: Teaching Audio Texts in the Classroom

This presentation looks at the potential of audiobooks for teaching fiction. Toni Morrison, and her performative readings of her own novels, will be the foci of this debate. While many scholars have objected to the use of audiobooks in the classroom, Toni Morrison, in interviews such as with Oprah Winfrey, discusses how audiobooks increase accessibility. Today’s shifting cultural needs, for students and popular audiences alike, demand a more flexible format for reading. Additionally, I will argue that audiobooks are not a “lazy” way to read novels, but rather that this form requires interpretative and analytical skills that should be taught in the classroom.
Advised by: Dr. Karen Weyler
ArtsKistaMansellInterior ArchitectureProf.Travis LeeHicksJo Ramsay-LeimenstollResurrected: New Life for Sacred Spaceshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnFobXRCKhEDue to shifting demographics and socio-cultural norms, historic places of worship frequently face abandonment and threat of demolition. The US has seen an average of 1,400 religious buildings per year come up for sale in recent years. Loss of these buildings is unsettling to communities in which they reside, as they help to foster a sense of place and community. They may also have historical or architectural significance, making demolition a lamentable option. The physical and symbolic qualities that make these buildings worth saving can also make them a challenge for adaptive reuse. A framework will be described to show how consideration of building form, site, new use, and community culture can result in a successful plan for adaptive reuse. Several case studies will be presented to illustrate ways these structures have been creatively adapted while preserving their architectural and cultural significance.Kista Mansell
Interior Architecture
In collaboration with: Jo Ramsay-Leimenstoll, Prof. Travis Lee Hicks
Resurrected: New Life for Sacred Spaces

Due to shifting demographics and socio-cultural norms, historic places of worship frequently face abandonment and threat of demolition. The US has seen an average of 1,400 religious buildings per year come up for sale in recent years. Loss of these buildings is unsettling to communities in which they reside, as they help to foster a sense of place and community. They may also have historical or architectural significance, making demolition a lamentable option. The physical and symbolic qualities that make these buildings worth saving can also make them a challenge for adaptive reuse. A framework will be described to show how consideration of building form, site, new use, and community culture can result in a successful plan for adaptive reuse. Several case studies will be presented to illustrate ways these structures have been creatively adapted while preserving their architectural and cultural significance.
Advised by: Prof. Travis Lee Hicks
ArtsAllisonMcCarthyDanceDr.Ana PaulaHöflingViolent Transitions: Analyzing and Embodying Collateral Consequenceshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fv8UjZ93rssThe United States has the highest incarceration rate and prison population in the world, and it is steadily rising. Additionally, the country’s often-neglected community of formerly incarcerated individuals is also rapidly growing in size. In this research project, I interviewed several previously incarcerated women who are now returning citizens. These individuals were all previous residents of Benevolence Farm, a social services organization in Graham, North Carolina that provides housing and employment opportunities for previously incarcerated women. These interviews focused on two areas of transition: the move from prison to the farm, and the move from the farm into independent living situations. I brought this data into the dance studio and employed choreographic and improvisational activities to explore the embodiment of the feelings and narratives offered in the interviews. This presentation will showcase the process and reflections of myself and the dancers throughout the research project., IRB# 21-0192Allison McCarthy
Dance
In collaboration with: Dr. Ana Paula Höfling
Violent Transitions: Analyzing and Embodying Collateral Consequences

The United States has the highest incarceration rate and prison population in the world, and it is steadily rising. Additionally, the country’s often-neglected community of formerly incarcerated individuals is also rapidly growing in size. In this research project, I interviewed several previously incarcerated women who are now returning citizens. These individuals were all previous residents of Benevolence Farm, a social services organization in Graham, North Carolina that provides housing and employment opportunities for previously incarcerated women. These interviews focused on two areas of transition: the move from prison to the farm, and the move from the farm into independent living situations. I brought this data into the dance studio and employed choreographic and improvisational activities to explore the embodiment of the feelings and narratives offered in the interviews. This presentation will showcase the process and reflections of myself and the dancers throughout the research project.
Advised by: Dr. Ana Paula Höfling
ArtsCaitlynSchraderDanceDr.Ana PaulaHöflingYvonne Rainer and the “No Manifesto:” Redefining Virtuosity Through the Aesthetic of Denialhttps://youtu.be/dkkNUlNaJj8This project utilizes archival, historical research accompanied by embodied practice-as-research, bridging the intersections of theory, history, and practice. Like many other postmodern dance artists in the mid to late twentieth century, Yvonne Rainer declared an opposition to the dominant form of modernist dance. Instead, Rainer and her contemporaries forged a new path, proposing a radical approach to dance making – questioning status-quo and redefining dance in the process. In 1965, Rainer also published her “No Manifesto” which outlined the foundational underpinnings of such radical juxtaposition, one being “No to virtuosity.” Using Rainer’s personal archive of her works made between 1961-1975, I explore the changing role of virtuosity in dance starting from the postmodern era. What I aim to communicate is how Yvonne Rainer herself was both virtuosic and a-virtuosic in her approach to dance, furthering proving that Rainer both challenged notions of virtuosity and redefined dance-based virtuosity altogether.Caitlyn Schrader
Dance
In collaboration with: Dr. Ana Paula Höfling
Yvonne Rainer and the “No Manifesto:” Redefining Virtuosity Through the Aesthetic of Denial

This project utilizes archival, historical research accompanied by embodied practice-as-research, bridging the intersections of theory, history, and practice. Like many other postmodern dance artists in the mid to late twentieth century, Yvonne Rainer declared an opposition to the dominant form of modernist dance. Instead, Rainer and her contemporaries forged a new path, proposing a radical approach to dance making – questioning status-quo and redefining dance in the process. In 1965, Rainer also published her “No Manifesto” which outlined the foundational underpinnings of such radical juxtaposition, one being “No to virtuosity.” Using Rainer’s personal archive of her works made between 1961-1975, I explore the changing role of virtuosity in dance starting from the postmodern era. What I aim to communicate is how Yvonne Rainer herself was both virtuosic and a-virtuosic in her approach to dance, furthering proving that Rainer both challenged notions of virtuosity and redefined dance-based virtuosity altogether.
Advised by: Dr. Ana Paula Höfling
ArtsBrianWinnDanceDr.Ana PaulaHöflingAna Paula Höfling, Janet Lilly, B.J. Sullivan (committee members)pass/codes: Code Switching for Survivalhttps://youtu.be/Gj6jt7ybAaIpass/codes addresses the ways in which society monitors, controls, and polices people (minorities) based on their identities, specifically those who identify as-part of the queer community (people who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, gender non-binary, transgender, etc.). As such, I focus on code switching as a survival tool in the world. My research is supported by viewings of choreographic work that deals with issues of the representation of sexuality on stage, diversity in choreographic intent in regard to sexuality, queer gestures and embodiment, and code-switching/passing strategies in professional settings. I draw upon people’s lived experiences in this work and as such, it brings to light real issues that queer people experience daily.Brian Winn
Dance
In collaboration with: Ana Paula Höfling, Janet Lilly, B.J. Sullivan (committee members), Dr. Ana Paula Höfling
pass/codes: Code Switching for Survival

pass/codes addresses the ways in which society monitors, controls, and polices people (minorities) based on their identities, specifically those who identify as-part of the queer community (people who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, gender non-binary, transgender, etc.). As such, I focus on code switching as a survival tool in the world. My research is supported by viewings of choreographic work that deals with issues of the representation of sexuality on stage, diversity in choreographic intent in regard to sexuality, queer gestures and embodiment, and code-switching/passing strategies in professional settings. I draw upon people’s lived experiences in this work and as such, it brings to light real issues that queer people experience daily.
Advised by: Dr. Ana Paula Höfling
Health SciencesJeffreyAkersKinesiologyDr.PamKocher BrownIncreasing Physical Activity and Self Efficacy in PE by Flipping the Classroomhttps://youtu.be/M-MRP1Nr-asFlipped learning has emerged as a successful approach in many disciplines other than physical education. This study flipped the PE classroom to compare MVPA minutes to those of traditional classes. Since physical education classes may be the only time students are active, maximizing activity during class is critical. This is important because adolescent physical activity rates remain dangerously low and can lead to health problems as adults. By modernizing physical education, this study expected that more time would be spent in MVPA during class. Results indicated MVPA increased in the flipped approach while student responses post-intervention indicated positive feelings towards flipped learning in PE. These encouraging results indicate leveraging screen time through flipped learning may be a valuable resource in the struggle to increase physical activity of adolescents., IRB# 17-0406Jeffrey Akers
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Dr. Pam Kocher Brown
Increasing Physical Activity and Self Efficacy in PE by Flipping the Classroom

Flipped learning has emerged as a successful approach in many disciplines other than physical education. This study flipped the PE classroom to compare MVPA minutes to those of traditional classes. Since physical education classes may be the only time students are active, maximizing activity during class is critical. This is important because adolescent physical activity rates remain dangerously low and can lead to health problems as adults. By modernizing physical education, this study expected that more time would be spent in MVPA during class. Results indicated MVPA increased in the flipped approach while student responses post-intervention indicated positive feelings towards flipped learning in PE. These encouraging results indicate leveraging screen time through flipped learning may be a valuable resource in the struggle to increase physical activity of adolescents.
Advised by: Dr. Pam Kocher Brown
Health SciencesMd TowfiqulAlamPublic Health EducationDr.SandraEcheverriaMelissa J. DuPont-Reyes, Elizabeth Vasquez, Rosenda Murillo, Tailisha Gonzalez, Fatima RodriguezEducational Attainment and Prevalence of Cardiovascular Health (Life’s Simple 7) in Asian Americanshttps://youtu.be/d7U7Nf1UWWoWe examined if education was associated with CVH and the association varied by time in the United States (U.S.). Our study population included Asian Americans, 20+ years, sampled in the 2011-16 NHANES (n = 1,634). Ideal CVH was based on American Heart Association defined seven metrics. We fit logistic regression models for analyses. The prevalence of ideal CVH was 17.1% among those living in the U.S. <10 years, 7.1% living 10+ years, and 15.9% for the U.S.-born. All models showed low education compared to high education was associated with lower odds of ideal CVH. This pattern remained in adjusted models but became non-significant when controlling for nativity (odds ratio = 0.34, 95% confidence interval: 0.10, 1.13). Models stratified by time in the U.S. were less consistent but showed similar education gradients in CVH. Low education is a risk factor for attaining ideal CVH among Asian Americans, regardless of time in the U.S.Md Towfiqul Alam
Public Health Education
In collaboration with: Melissa J. DuPont-Reyes, Elizabeth Vasquez, Rosenda Murillo, Tailisha Gonzalez, Fatima Rodriguez, Dr. Sandra Echeverria
Educational Attainment and Prevalence of Cardiovascular Health (Life’s Simple 7) in Asian Americans

We examined if education was associated with CVH and the association varied by time in the United States (U.S.). Our study population included Asian Americans, 20+ years, sampled in the 2011-16 NHANES (n = 1,634). Ideal CVH was based on American Heart Association defined seven metrics. We fit logistic regression models for analyses. The prevalence of ideal CVH was 17.1% among those living in the U.S. <10 years, 7.1% living 10+ years, and 15.9% for the U.S.-born. All models showed low education compared to high education was associated with lower odds of ideal CVH. This pattern remained in adjusted models but became non-significant when controlling for nativity (odds ratio = 0.34, 95% confidence interval: 0.10, 1.13). Models stratified by time in the U.S. were less consistent but showed similar education gradients in CVH. Low education is a risk factor for attaining ideal CVH among Asian Americans, regardless of time in the U.S.
Advised by: Dr. Sandra Echeverria
Health SciencesSeunghyunBaekKinesiologyDr.BenDysonDonal Howley, Yanhua Shen, Judy FowlerHow Can We Promote Social and Emotional Learning in Physical Education?: International Teacher Educators' Perspectiveshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kTyV2liNQAThe purpose of this study was to explore international teacher educators’ perspectives of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) strategies in Physical Education (PE). Eighteen teacher educators participated in this study from ten different countries (Australia, Brazil, Cyprus, China, Finland, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, South Korea, USA). Using a qualitative case design (Merriam, 2015; Stake, 2005), data were collected through in-depth interviews with a video-conferencing system called ‘Zoom’. The data were analyzed following transcription, organization of raw data, creation of descriptive codes followed by inferential coding (Miles, Huberman, & Saldana, 2014).
The findings indicated that teacher educators emphasized the following SEL strategies for implementing PE classes: a) Providing problem-solving experiences in groups, b) Demonstrating how SEL skills look like, c) Using positive behavioral strategies, and d) Giving opportunities for reflection.
This research provides implications from an international faculty for SEL implementation in school PE programs.
, IRB# 20-0422Seunghyun Baek
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Donal Howley, Yanhua Shen, Judy Fowler, Dr. Ben Dyson
How Can We Promote Social and Emotional Learning in Physical Education?: International Teacher Educators' Perspectives

The purpose of this study was to explore international teacher educators’ perspectives of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) strategies in Physical Education (PE). Eighteen teacher educators participated in this study from ten different countries (Australia, Brazil, Cyprus, China, Finland, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, South Korea, USA). Using a qualitative case design (Merriam, 2015; Stake, 2005), data were collected through in-depth interviews with a video-conferencing system called ‘Zoom’. The data were analyzed following transcription, organization of raw data, creation of descriptive codes followed by inferential coding (Miles, Huberman, & Saldana, 2014).
The findings indicated that teacher educators emphasized the following SEL strategies for implementing PE classes: a) Providing problem-solving experiences in groups, b) Demonstrating how SEL skills look like, c) Using positive behavioral strategies, and d) Giving opportunities for reflection.
This research provides implications from an international faculty for SEL implementation in school PE programs.
Advised by: Dr. Ben Dyson
Health SciencesJasonBrantleyKinesiologyDr.TraciParryLouisa Tichy, George BlackburnExercise Preconditioning Preserves Skeletal Muscle Function and Stunts Tumor Growth in Male Micehttps://youtu.be/4qqz-PXq9J0Cancer cachexia is a complex muscle and fat wasting disorder that results in death in up to one-third of cancer patients. Currently, there are no clear diagnostic criteria, its effects are irreversible, and it cannot be treated. To examine the effects of exercise on skeletal muscle wasting and tumor growth during cancer cachexia, mice underwent either 8 weeks of exercise (TM) or remained sedentary (SED) followed by a 4-week sedentary period of tumor-bearing (T) or non-tumor bearing (NT). Interestingly, the TM+T group showed a significant improvement (preservation) in muscle function versus the SED+T group (p<0.05) while also exhibiting a 16-fold smaller tumor volume (P<0.001) when compared to SED+T tumors. These data indicate that exercise is capable of eliciting a protective effect against cancer cachexia-mediated declines in muscle function and tumor growth.Jason Brantley
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Louisa Tichy, George Blackburn, Dr. Traci Parry
Exercise Preconditioning Preserves Skeletal Muscle Function and Stunts Tumor Growth in Male Mice

Cancer cachexia is a complex muscle and fat wasting disorder that results in death in up to one-third of cancer patients. Currently, there are no clear diagnostic criteria, its effects are irreversible, and it cannot be treated. To examine the effects of exercise on skeletal muscle wasting and tumor growth during cancer cachexia, mice underwent either 8 weeks of exercise (TM) or remained sedentary (SED) followed by a 4-week sedentary period of tumor-bearing (T) or non-tumor bearing (NT). Interestingly, the TM+T group showed a significant improvement (preservation) in muscle function versus the SED+T group (p<0.05) while also exhibiting a 16-fold smaller tumor volume (P<0.001) when compared to SED+T tumors. These data indicate that exercise is capable of eliciting a protective effect against cancer cachexia-mediated declines in muscle function and tumor growth.
Advised by: Dr. Traci Parry
Health SciencesSouravChakrabortyBiologyDr.Ramji K.BhandariBPA enables Transgenerational Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Diseasehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBd0v5vwBd0A silent killer, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), needs liver transplantation if not diagnosed in earlier stages. From our animal model studies have shown that environmental chemical exposure of embryos triggers NAFLD later in life and in subsequent generations (transgenerational), who are not exposed to chemicals anymore. To understand the mechanism underlying inheritance of NAFLD, we have used Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) as a transgenerational animal model, which has 70% similarity in fat metabolism to humans. The grandchildren of medaka fish whose grandparents were exposed to a chemical in plastics (bisphenol A, also called BPA) during their embryonic development exhibited hyperlipidemia. Our histological and gene expression assay results show NAFLD prognosis in medaka liver cells. This study suggests a grandparent’s lifestyle can result in liver disease in grandchildren and provides insights into the possibility for such adverse health outcomes in humans.Sourav Chakraborty
Biology
In collaboration with: Dr. Ramji K. Bhandari
BPA enables Transgenerational Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

A silent killer, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), needs liver transplantation if not diagnosed in earlier stages. From our animal model studies have shown that environmental chemical exposure of embryos triggers NAFLD later in life and in subsequent generations (transgenerational), who are not exposed to chemicals anymore. To understand the mechanism underlying inheritance of NAFLD, we have used Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) as a transgenerational animal model, which has 70% similarity in fat metabolism to humans. The grandchildren of medaka fish whose grandparents were exposed to a chemical in plastics (bisphenol A, also called BPA) during their embryonic development exhibited hyperlipidemia. Our histological and gene expression assay results show NAFLD prognosis in medaka liver cells. This study suggests a grandparent’s lifestyle can result in liver disease in grandchildren and provides insights into the possibility for such adverse health outcomes in humans.
Advised by: Dr. Ramji K. Bhandari
Health SciencesCarrieDossNursingDr.NancyHoffartApproaches Used by Nurse Residency Program Staff to Enhance Transition to Practice: A Secondary Analysishttps://youtu.be/cWxbP1uAp3oNurse residency programs (NRP) are structured orientations that assist in the transition to practice process for newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs). The transition from nursing education to practice is difficult and NRPs have been shown to improve job retention and increase job satisfaction, which is vital to the nursing workforce. How the staff provides meaningful support to NLRNs is what is lacking in the literature. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study is to identify the techniques and strategies that NRP staff use to provide meaningful support to NLRNs. This is important because their support can make a difference in whether the NLRN stays or leaves the job or possibly the nursing profession. There are many strategies used by NRP staff that are specific to three unique staff roles and a few approaches that are used across all staff. This helps add evidence of how to effectively offer these programs., IRB# 19-0102Carrie Doss
Nursing
In collaboration with: Dr. Nancy Hoffart
Approaches Used by Nurse Residency Program Staff to Enhance Transition to Practice: A Secondary Analysis

Nurse residency programs (NRP) are structured orientations that assist in the transition to practice process for newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs). The transition from nursing education to practice is difficult and NRPs have been shown to improve job retention and increase job satisfaction, which is vital to the nursing workforce. How the staff provides meaningful support to NLRNs is what is lacking in the literature. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study is to identify the techniques and strategies that NRP staff use to provide meaningful support to NLRNs. This is important because their support can make a difference in whether the NLRN stays or leaves the job or possibly the nursing profession. There are many strategies used by NRP staff that are specific to three unique staff roles and a few approaches that are used across all staff. This helps add evidence of how to effectively offer these programs.
Advised by: Dr. Nancy Hoffart
Health SciencesQuinnDuclosPublic Health EducationDr.Meredith R.GringlePodcasting and Pedagogy: Practice-Based Evidence in Health and Human Scienceshttps://youtu.be/bjBrpiaNKBwOn March 11th, 2020, a health alert was posted to the UNCG website that changed the university’s academic landscape for the immediate and foreseeable future. Due to the COVID19 pandemic, classes were suspended starting March 13th, 2020. When classes resumed on March 23rd, most had shifted to an online format in the interest of student safety. This academic year, many departments have continued the trend of fully online or hybrid instruction. Subsequently, instructors are searching for the next teaching innovation; a way for students stay engaged in a digital classroom—enter podcasting. A podcast is “a program (…music or talk) made available in digital format for automatic download over the Internet” (Merriam-Webster). Podcasting has been used as a way to reach masses of people for entertainment, news, and more. The personal nature of a podcast can allow the instructor to co-construct a learning environment conducive to online classrooms.Quinn Duclos
Public Health Education
In collaboration with: Dr. Meredith R. Gringle
Podcasting and Pedagogy: Practice-Based Evidence in Health and Human Sciences

On March 11th, 2020, a health alert was posted to the UNCG website that changed the university’s academic landscape for the immediate and foreseeable future. Due to the COVID19 pandemic, classes were suspended starting March 13th, 2020. When classes resumed on March 23rd, most had shifted to an online format in the interest of student safety. This academic year, many departments have continued the trend of fully online or hybrid instruction. Subsequently, instructors are searching for the next teaching innovation; a way for students stay engaged in a digital classroom—enter podcasting. A podcast is “a program (…music or talk) made available in digital format for automatic download over the Internet” (Merriam-Webster). Podcasting has been used as a way to reach masses of people for entertainment, news, and more. The personal nature of a podcast can allow the instructor to co-construct a learning environment conducive to online classrooms.
Advised by: Dr. Meredith R. Gringle
Health SciencesHannaGardnerKinesiologyDr.ChristopherRheaLaurie WidemanCombined Physical and Cognitive Exercise Resulting in Decreasing Performance (i.e. fatigue); A Systematic Reviewhttps://youtu.be/EFvxVoHiSx0Objective: To systematically review the existing literature on combined physical and cognitive exercise resulting in decreasing performance (i.e. fatigue).
Study Selection: Due to the integrated interpretation of the relationship of cognitive processing and physical action that induces pervasive fatigue, studies were pulled if they observed (1) a dual-task consisting of exercise with an on-going cognitive task, or alternately the intermittent performance of exercise and cognitive task and (2) measured fatigue associated with task performance consisting of either an on-going performance or psychometric measure indicating elevated stress (i.e. fatigue) that would induce performance decrement. Articles were excluded if they included unhealthy populations or were outside of the desired age range of adolescence-adult (13-44 years old).
Conclusions: Current literature of realistic exercise tasks (i.e. dual tasks of cognitive processing and physical action) that induce fatigue is lacking. Future research should focus on creating realistic sport environments of varying complexities which challenge the demands of decision-making for the athlete. This will provide applicable information on how the system really fatigues under varying loads, with the ultimate goal to design training methodologies for greater resistance to fatigue.
Hanna Gardner
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Laurie Wideman, Dr. Christopher Rhea
Combined Physical and Cognitive Exercise Resulting in Decreasing Performance (i.e. fatigue); A Systematic Review

Objective: To systematically review the existing literature on combined physical and cognitive exercise resulting in decreasing performance (i.e. fatigue).
Study Selection: Due to the integrated interpretation of the relationship of cognitive processing and physical action that induces pervasive fatigue, studies were pulled if they observed (1) a dual-task consisting of exercise with an on-going cognitive task, or alternately the intermittent performance of exercise and cognitive task and (2) measured fatigue associated with task performance consisting of either an on-going performance or psychometric measure indicating elevated stress (i.e. fatigue) that would induce performance decrement. Articles were excluded if they included unhealthy populations or were outside of the desired age range of adolescence-adult (13-44 years old).
Conclusions: Current literature of realistic exercise tasks (i.e. dual tasks of cognitive processing and physical action) that induce fatigue is lacking. Future research should focus on creating realistic sport environments of varying complexities which challenge the demands of decision-making for the athlete. This will provide applicable information on how the system really fatigues under varying loads, with the ultimate goal to design training methodologies for greater resistance to fatigue.
Advised by: Dr. Christopher Rhea
Health SciencesDerekHevelKinesiologyDr.Jaclyn P.MaherFeelings of Pleasantness for the Promotion of Physical Activity in College Studentshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZK2V2ja_UoDespite the mental and physical health benefits of physical activity, few college students engage in the recommended amount. Physical activity participation declines during college, likely due to changes in life experiences (e.g., new social groups) and responsibilities (e.g., coursework). Feeling more pleasant, during physical activity has been linked with increased future physical activity participation months later. However, this evidence comes from laboratory-based studies which takes place in an artificial environment that likely does not reflect the typical physical activity environment in the real world. New methodology using smartphones and activity monitors can capture feelings of pleasure during physical activity and also predict how pleasure during physical activity leads to future participation in real-world settings. Enhancing pleasure during physical activity can lead to more effective physical activity promotion efforts and lead to benefits like increased lifelong quality of life, improved mood, and better stress management in college students’ everyday life.Derek Hevel
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Dr. Jaclyn P. Maher
Feelings of Pleasantness for the Promotion of Physical Activity in College Students

Despite the mental and physical health benefits of physical activity, few college students engage in the recommended amount. Physical activity participation declines during college, likely due to changes in life experiences (e.g., new social groups) and responsibilities (e.g., coursework). Feeling more pleasant, during physical activity has been linked with increased future physical activity participation months later. However, this evidence comes from laboratory-based studies which takes place in an artificial environment that likely does not reflect the typical physical activity environment in the real world. New methodology using smartphones and activity monitors can capture feelings of pleasure during physical activity and also predict how pleasure during physical activity leads to future participation in real-world settings. Enhancing pleasure during physical activity can lead to more effective physical activity promotion efforts and lead to benefits like increased lifelong quality of life, improved mood, and better stress management in college students’ everyday life.
Advised by: Dr. Jaclyn P. Maher
Health SciencesDonalHowleyKinesiologyDr.BenDysonGlobal Experiences of teaching and learning in K-12 Health and Physical Education during COVID-19https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_Yi9D5LdIA&feature=youtu.beThe purpose of this qualitative international comparative case study was to explore teachers’ experiences of teaching and learning in K-12 Health and Physical Education (HPE) settings during COVID-19. 10 K-12 HPE teachers working in a variety of public, private, and alternative education settings in 8 countries agreed to participate using photovoice and interviews. Many of the realities and inequities spoken about here previously existed such as: issues around flexibility in implementing standardized curricula and assessment; narrow and traditional pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning in HPE emphasising physical activity and exercise; establishing connection between students and the subject; a lack of social and emotional support for students; and issues around equitable access. Further opportunities for teachers, and especially students, to reflect on their experiences of teaching and learning during COVID-19 are needed to better understand how this period has impacted HPE classrooms., IRB# 21-0128Donal Howley
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Dr. Ben Dyson
Global Experiences of teaching and learning in K-12 Health and Physical Education during COVID-19

The purpose of this qualitative international comparative case study was to explore teachers’ experiences of teaching and learning in K-12 Health and Physical Education (HPE) settings during COVID-19. 10 K-12 HPE teachers working in a variety of public, private, and alternative education settings in 8 countries agreed to participate using photovoice and interviews. Many of the realities and inequities spoken about here previously existed such as: issues around flexibility in implementing standardized curricula and assessment; narrow and traditional pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning in HPE emphasising physical activity and exercise; establishing connection between students and the subject; a lack of social and emotional support for students; and issues around equitable access. Further opportunities for teachers, and especially students, to reflect on their experiences of teaching and learning during COVID-19 are needed to better understand how this period has impacted HPE classrooms.
Advised by: Dr. Ben Dyson
Health SciencesMeganJohnsonKinesiologyDr.Eric SDrolletteCaroline C. Meadows, Kinley A. McKay, Derek J. Hevel, Dr. Jaclyn P. MaherEvaluating the moderating effects of positive affect on inhibitory control outcomes following a single bout of physical activityhttps://youtu.be/PKKGhM3NG_kRecent research suggests intra-individual differences may be a moderator of cognitive benefits following a single bout of physical activity. The present study seeks to evaluate moderating mental states –specifically positive affect – on inhibitory control following a single bout of physical activity. Using a within-participants design, eighty young adults (54 females; 21.7 ± 2.7 years old) completed a flanker task and affect measures directly before and after 15 minutes of seated rest or a single bout of self-selected aerobic physical activity. The results reveal that inhibitory control performance is moderated or influenced by positive affect, suggesting individuals with lower positive affect before engaging in physical activity experience greater subsequent cognitive and positive affect improvements. Such findings highlight the need for future research to explore individual differences in mental states as a possible mechanism to predict cognitive improvements following acute physical activity., IRB# 20-0243Megan Johnson
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Caroline C. Meadows, Kinley A. McKay, Derek J. Hevel, Dr. Jaclyn P. Maher, Dr. Eric S Drollette
Evaluating the moderating effects of positive affect on inhibitory control outcomes following a single bout of physical activity

Recent research suggests intra-individual differences may be a moderator of cognitive benefits following a single bout of physical activity. The present study seeks to evaluate moderating mental states –specifically positive affect – on inhibitory control following a single bout of physical activity. Using a within-participants design, eighty young adults (54 females; 21.7 ± 2.7 years old) completed a flanker task and affect measures directly before and after 15 minutes of seated rest or a single bout of self-selected aerobic physical activity. The results reveal that inhibitory control performance is moderated or influenced by positive affect, suggesting individuals with lower positive affect before engaging in physical activity experience greater subsequent cognitive and positive affect improvements. Such findings highlight the need for future research to explore individual differences in mental states as a possible mechanism to predict cognitive improvements following acute physical activity.
Advised by: Dr. Eric S Drollette
Health SciencesCarolineMeadowsKinesiologyDr.Eric S.DrolletteKinley A. McKay, Beth R. Bacon, Katherine M. Cromer, Josephine R. Compeau, Derek J. Hevel, Dr. Jaclyn P. MaherAcute interval physical activity does not alter mind-wandering during a working memory task in young adultshttps://youtu.be/bYtwYumioEsMind wandering, shifts in mental thoughts, frequently occurs daily among young adults. Although research is conclusive regarding improved mental functioning following a bout of physical activity, the effects on mind wandering remain unknown. This study aims to determine the after effects of acute interval physical activity on mind-wandering during a working memory task. Before and immediately after each session of physical activity and inactivity, participants (n= 85) completed a working memory change detection task with mind-wandering thought probes occurring approximately every two minutes. Results revealed a reduction in task-related interference and an increase in task-unrelated thoughts from before to after each session, with no difference observed between physical activity and inactivity. These data suggest that among college students mind-wandering is not affected immediately following a single session of interval physical activity but expand current understanding regarding effects of physical activity on other aspects of mental functioning during a cognitive task., IRB# 115180Caroline Meadows
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Kinley A. McKay, Beth R. Bacon, Katherine M. Cromer, Josephine R. Compeau, Derek J. Hevel, Dr. Jaclyn P. Maher, Dr. Eric S. Drollette
Acute interval physical activity does not alter mind-wandering during a working memory task in young adults

Mind wandering, shifts in mental thoughts, frequently occurs daily among young adults. Although research is conclusive regarding improved mental functioning following a bout of physical activity, the effects on mind wandering remain unknown. This study aims to determine the after effects of acute interval physical activity on mind-wandering during a working memory task. Before and immediately after each session of physical activity and inactivity, participants (n= 85) completed a working memory change detection task with mind-wandering thought probes occurring approximately every two minutes. Results revealed a reduction in task-related interference and an increase in task-unrelated thoughts from before to after each session, with no difference observed between physical activity and inactivity. These data suggest that among college students mind-wandering is not affected immediately following a single session of interval physical activity but expand current understanding regarding effects of physical activity on other aspects of mental functioning during a cognitive task.
Advised by: Dr. Eric S. Drollette
Health SciencesColemanMurrayNutritionDr.LaurenHaldemanMedical Providers' Perceptions of and Response to Adolescent Hypertension: The Role of Social Determinants of Health in Messaginghttps://youtu.be/GpLTmU2PCtUAwareness regarding adolescent hypertension remains low despite the large number of individuals affected by hypertension in both adult and pediatric care settings. Medical providers must be prepared to diagnose, provide treatment, and follow-up appointments regarding adolescent hypertension; however, research shows that medical providers may not feel comfortable in this role and that certain groups of adolescents may be more likely to go undiagnosed with hypertension, despite the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation to assess blood pressure yearly, at minimum, in all children. The purpose of this study is to identify medical providers' perceptions of and response to adolescent hypertension, to identify if and how social determinants of health play a role in messaging to adolescents with hypertension, and to examine barriers experienced by medical providers with regards to the diagnosis and treatment of adolescent hypertension. An electronic survey and interviews of medical providers will be utilized to meet these goals., IRB# 20-0219Coleman Murray
Nutrition
In collaboration with: Dr. Lauren Haldeman
Medical Providers' Perceptions of and Response to Adolescent Hypertension: The Role of Social Determinants of Health in Messaging

Awareness regarding adolescent hypertension remains low despite the large number of individuals affected by hypertension in both adult and pediatric care settings. Medical providers must be prepared to diagnose, provide treatment, and follow-up appointments regarding adolescent hypertension; however, research shows that medical providers may not feel comfortable in this role and that certain groups of adolescents may be more likely to go undiagnosed with hypertension, despite the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation to assess blood pressure yearly, at minimum, in all children. The purpose of this study is to identify medical providers' perceptions of and response to adolescent hypertension, to identify if and how social determinants of health play a role in messaging to adolescents with hypertension, and to examine barriers experienced by medical providers with regards to the diagnosis and treatment of adolescent hypertension. An electronic survey and interviews of medical providers will be utilized to meet these goals.
Advised by: Dr. Lauren Haldeman
Health SciencesAmyNewtonNursingDr.Katie ScottWingateDeborah A. Lekan, Tara A. Cleary, Eric A. GillSetting Patient Expectations: Evaluating Preoperative Educational Videos on Patient Anxiety and Satisfactionhttps://youtu.be/rvB1rhCaLnABackground: Patient consumerism along with increasing competition in healthcare is changing ambulatory surgery. Patient anxiety and satisfaction are now more important than ever. Surgery Center complaints from patients about lack of information and patient anxiety need to be addressed to ensure continued success.
Purpose: This project’s purpose was to set reasonable patient expectations with the use of educational videos to decrease anxiety while increasing patient satisfaction scores.
Methods: This quality improvement project utilized a quantitative, repeated cross-sectional design that took take place in an Eye Center within the South-eastern United States. The control group consisted of 28 participants and the intervention group had 2. Anxiety was measured with The Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) while satisfaction was measured with a program evaluation survey.
Results: Analysis showed that 89.2% of participants had low levels of preoperative anxiety and that 60.8% of participants had a need for additional information. Patient satisfaction scores rose 2-7% after the completion of this project.
Recommendations and Conclusion: This quality improvement project demonstrated an increased need for preoperative information in cataract patients while also showing that educational videos may increase patient satisfaction. Additional research needs to be completed to see if educational videos increase patient satisfaction.
, IRB# 20-0508Amy Newton
Nursing
In collaboration with: Deborah A. Lekan, Tara A. Cleary, Eric A. Gill, Dr. Katie Scott Wingate
Setting Patient Expectations: Evaluating Preoperative Educational Videos on Patient Anxiety and Satisfaction

Background: Patient consumerism along with increasing competition in healthcare is changing ambulatory surgery. Patient anxiety and satisfaction are now more important than ever. Surgery Center complaints from patients about lack of information and patient anxiety need to be addressed to ensure continued success.
Purpose: This project’s purpose was to set reasonable patient expectations with the use of educational videos to decrease anxiety while increasing patient satisfaction scores.
Methods: This quality improvement project utilized a quantitative, repeated cross-sectional design that took take place in an Eye Center within the South-eastern United States. The control group consisted of 28 participants and the intervention group had 2. Anxiety was measured with The Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) while satisfaction was measured with a program evaluation survey.
Results: Analysis showed that 89.2% of participants had low levels of preoperative anxiety and that 60.8% of participants had a need for additional information. Patient satisfaction scores rose 2-7% after the completion of this project.
Recommendations and Conclusion: This quality improvement project demonstrated an increased need for preoperative information in cataract patients while also showing that educational videos may increase patient satisfaction. Additional research needs to be completed to see if educational videos increase patient satisfaction.
Advised by: Dr. Katie Scott Wingate
Health SciencesMacPiersonKinesiologyDr.ChristopherRheaImplementing OPTIMAL Theory in Lower Extremity Tasks to Reduce Risk of Injuryhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Cg4Kr-WDx0Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries account for the most sport participation time lost relative to all other tracked injuries. An ACL injury can have many negative consequences. It can sideline an athlete for 12-14 months from activity. ACL injuries can also have a heavy financial cost, which equate to billions of dollars in health care costs annually (Mather et al., 2013). To help combat this issue, ACL injury prevention programs were created. However, little has changed in these programs since inception. The field of motor learning could offer many impactful changes to current ACL IPPs. Recently, the OPTIMAL Theory (OT) was utilized in upper extremity movements to aid motor performance. OT is comprised of three components: external focus of attention, enhanced expectancies and autonomy of support. Application of OT to lower extremity movement to negate injury is not well investigated but could hold impactful results in injury reduction., IRB# 21-0022Mac Pierson
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Dr. Christopher Rhea
Implementing OPTIMAL Theory in Lower Extremity Tasks to Reduce Risk of Injury

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries account for the most sport participation time lost relative to all other tracked injuries. An ACL injury can have many negative consequences. It can sideline an athlete for 12-14 months from activity. ACL injuries can also have a heavy financial cost, which equate to billions of dollars in health care costs annually (Mather et al., 2013). To help combat this issue, ACL injury prevention programs were created. However, little has changed in these programs since inception. The field of motor learning could offer many impactful changes to current ACL IPPs. Recently, the OPTIMAL Theory (OT) was utilized in upper extremity movements to aid motor performance. OT is comprised of three components: external focus of attention, enhanced expectancies and autonomy of support. Application of OT to lower extremity movement to negate injury is not well investigated but could hold impactful results in injury reduction.
Advised by: Dr. Christopher Rhea
Health SciencesYukiSugimotoKinesiologyDr.ScottRoss & Dr. Carl MattacolaThe Study of Individual Perception in Coordinating Postural Control When There Is An Increase in Complexity of the Task and Environmental Constraints in CAI individuals Compared to Healthy Controlshttps://youtu.be/ZK8EuyJEzsMIndividuals with Chronic Ankle Instability (CAI) exhibit postural control deficits due to diminished ability to perceive relevant sensory feedback from a previously sprained ankle. As a result, CAI individuals display compensatory reliance on vision to maintain posture in a single-leg stance. In spite, why postural control deficits persist in CAI compared to healthy individuals is still unknown. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to understand the modulation of sensory feedback coordinating postural control when there is an increase in the task and environmental constraints in individuals with and without CAI., IRB# 20-0204Yuki Sugimoto
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Dr. Scott Ross & Dr. Carl Mattacola
The Study of Individual Perception in Coordinating Postural Control When There Is An Increase in Complexity of the Task and Environmental Constraints in CAI individuals Compared to Healthy Controls

Individuals with Chronic Ankle Instability (CAI) exhibit postural control deficits due to diminished ability to perceive relevant sensory feedback from a previously sprained ankle. As a result, CAI individuals display compensatory reliance on vision to maintain posture in a single-leg stance. In spite, why postural control deficits persist in CAI compared to healthy individuals is still unknown. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to understand the modulation of sensory feedback coordinating postural control when there is an increase in the task and environmental constraints in individuals with and without CAI.
Advised by: Dr. Scott Ross & Dr. Carl Mattacola
Health SciencesLouisaTichyKinesiologyDr.Traci L.ParryJason Brantley, George BlackburnProtective Effects of Preconditioning Exercise on Skeletal Muscle Strength and Tumor Growth in the Female Tumor-Bearing Mousehttps://youtu.be/yo-SfqfN5KgCancer cachexia is a complex metabolic wasting disease that occurs in up to 80% of cancer patients and is responsible for about 20% of deaths in cancer patients. There are no clear diagnostic criteria for cancer cachexia, and it remains a vastly underestimated and untreated condition. To examine the effects of preconditioning exercise on muscle strength and tumor growth, female mice either remained sedentary (SED) or followed an 8-week exercise protocol (TM) followed by a sedentary period of tumor-bearing (T) or non-tumor bearing (NT) for 4 weeks. Following tumor bearing, SED+T mice showed significantly less skeletal muscle mass (P<0.05) compared to TM+T mice. Exercise resulted in a 20-fold decrease in tumor volume (P<0.05) and 60% decrease in tumor mass (P<0.05) when compared to SED tumors. The analyzed data indicate that preconditioning exercise appears to be able to protect the musculature and stunt tumor growth during cancer cachexia.Louisa Tichy
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Jason Brantley, George Blackburn, Dr. Traci L. Parry
Protective Effects of Preconditioning Exercise on Skeletal Muscle Strength and Tumor Growth in the Female Tumor-Bearing Mouse

Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic wasting disease that occurs in up to 80% of cancer patients and is responsible for about 20% of deaths in cancer patients. There are no clear diagnostic criteria for cancer cachexia, and it remains a vastly underestimated and untreated condition. To examine the effects of preconditioning exercise on muscle strength and tumor growth, female mice either remained sedentary (SED) or followed an 8-week exercise protocol (TM) followed by a sedentary period of tumor-bearing (T) or non-tumor bearing (NT) for 4 weeks. Following tumor bearing, SED+T mice showed significantly less skeletal muscle mass (P<0.05) compared to TM+T mice. Exercise resulted in a 20-fold decrease in tumor volume (P<0.05) and 60% decrease in tumor mass (P<0.05) when compared to SED tumors. The analyzed data indicate that preconditioning exercise appears to be able to protect the musculature and stunt tumor growth during cancer cachexia.
Advised by: Dr. Traci L. Parry
Health SciencesKarenValcheffNursingDr.NancyHoffartOlder Adults’ Perceptions of Disposition Decisions from the Emergency Departmenthttps://youtu.be/iaw3BhJejzMIt is necessary to improve patient outcomes with older adults who present to the emergency department. Patient-centered care strives to improve older adult outcomes from the emergency department. However, appropriate disposition decisions or discharges from the emergency department with older adults are becoming increasingly complex and challenging to achieve.
Purpose. This study utilized a conceptual Three-Talk Shared Decision-Making model to guide the research questions. The following are the research questions for the study:
• RQ1. What are older adults’ perceptions of their direct engagement in the decision-making process related to their disposition from the emergency department?
• RQ2. How do older adults who present to the emergency department for care perceive the discharge decision-making process and disposition decision from the emergency department?
• RQ3. What factors do older adults identify as important when making the decision about their disposition from the emergency department?
, IRB# 20-0193Karen Valcheff
Nursing
In collaboration with: Dr. Nancy Hoffart
Older Adults’ Perceptions of Disposition Decisions from the Emergency Department

It is necessary to improve patient outcomes with older adults who present to the emergency department. Patient-centered care strives to improve older adult outcomes from the emergency department. However, appropriate disposition decisions or discharges from the emergency department with older adults are becoming increasingly complex and challenging to achieve.
Purpose. This study utilized a conceptual Three-Talk Shared Decision-Making model to guide the research questions. The following are the research questions for the study:
• RQ1. What are older adults’ perceptions of their direct engagement in the decision-making process related to their disposition from the emergency department?
• RQ2. How do older adults who present to the emergency department for care perceive the discharge decision-making process and disposition decision from the emergency department?
• RQ3. What factors do older adults identify as important when making the decision about their disposition from the emergency department?
Advised by: Dr. Nancy Hoffart
Health SciencesSharonVannoyHealth Sciences NursingDr.Katie ScottWingateDeborah A. LekanA Quality Initiative Utilizing CDC's STEADI in a Family Medicine Practicehttps://youtu.be/t8eh9vRdO4MPurpose: To evaluate the use and acceptance of the Center for Disease Control’s STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents and Death Initiative) for fall prevention in a family medicine practice.

A leading cause of death in adults over age 65, falls are a costly yet preventable burden to the healthcare system. Numerous fall screening and prevention strategies are available to reduce fall frequency and injuries with varying results. STEADI is comprehensive and focuses the process of fall screening and intervention. Considering current physical and financial burdens of falling, care providers must improve the assessment and management of falls. With the aging Medicare population and the emphasis on fall risk screening and prevention with payors, improving coordination of and accessibility to an algorithmic, research driven approach is essential.
This initiative outlines an intervention which may be implemented more broadly within larger healthcare organizations to improve fall outcomes, reduce fall risk, and healthcare costs.
Sharon Vannoy
Health Sciences Nursing
In collaboration with: Deborah A. Lekan, Dr. Katie Scott Wingate
A Quality Initiative Utilizing CDC's STEADI in a Family Medicine Practice

Purpose: To evaluate the use and acceptance of the Center for Disease Control’s STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents and Death Initiative) for fall prevention in a family medicine practice.

A leading cause of death in adults over age 65, falls are a costly yet preventable burden to the healthcare system. Numerous fall screening and prevention strategies are available to reduce fall frequency and injuries with varying results. STEADI is comprehensive and focuses the process of fall screening and intervention. Considering current physical and financial burdens of falling, care providers must improve the assessment and management of falls. With the aging Medicare population and the emphasis on fall risk screening and prevention with payors, improving coordination of and accessibility to an algorithmic, research driven approach is essential.
This initiative outlines an intervention which may be implemented more broadly within larger healthcare organizations to improve fall outcomes, reduce fall risk, and healthcare costs.
Advised by: Dr. Katie Scott Wingate
Health SciencesZiyuYinNanoscienceDr.JianjunWeiA Flexible Platform for Electrochemical Detection of Dopamine Releasing from Living Cellshttps://youtu.be/7xL84zQ5tNUWith the more desirable for biological molecule detection in the early clinic diagnosis, such as dopamine secreting by living cells, a flexible miniaturized electrochemical biosensor with high sensitivity, wide workable detection range is demanding. Dopamine (DA) is a significant neurotransmitter, associated with regulating neuronal signal transduction and several critical illnesses, such as Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Therefore, the accurate detection of DA levels provides an early diagnosis and a tool to follow up the output of the treatments. In addition, the real-time detection of DA released from pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells by highly concentrated K+ stimulation is recorded by this flexible sensor, enabling the novel sensor to provide a facile application in early clinic diagnosis.Ziyu Yin
Nanoscience
In collaboration with: Dr. Jianjun Wei
A Flexible Platform for Electrochemical Detection of Dopamine Releasing from Living Cells

With the more desirable for biological molecule detection in the early clinic diagnosis, such as dopamine secreting by living cells, a flexible miniaturized electrochemical biosensor with high sensitivity, wide workable detection range is demanding. Dopamine (DA) is a significant neurotransmitter, associated with regulating neuronal signal transduction and several critical illnesses, such as Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Therefore, the accurate detection of DA levels provides an early diagnosis and a tool to follow up the output of the treatments. In addition, the real-time detection of DA released from pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells by highly concentrated K+ stimulation is recorded by this flexible sensor, enabling the novel sensor to provide a facile application in early clinic diagnosis.
Advised by: Dr. Jianjun Wei
Health SciencesBrooksYoungmark & Brittany ChesneyPublic Health EducationDr.David L.WyrickmyPlaybook: an evidence-based suite of wellness programming for student-athleteshttps://youtu.be/2nqmZoDjjZAWellness programming should be a top priority for all populations, including student-athletes. Targeted wellness programming for student-athletes is essential as they are under pressure to perform as both a student and an athlete successfully. Attention needs to be given to student-athlete wellness to support the unique pressures and challenges that student-athletes face. In the role of student-athletes, social and behavioral norms, expectancies, and intentions vary. To address these differences in roles, myPlaybook provides programming that provides specific strategies to promote the health and well-being of student-athletes. myPlaybook offers topics on mental health, stress management, alcohol and other drugs, nutrition, time management, and more. myPlaybook is equipped with engaging content and personalized feedback to support student-athletes as they navigate college as both a student and an athlete.Brooks Youngmark & Brittany Chesney
Public Health Education
In collaboration with: Dr. David L. Wyrick
myPlaybook: an evidence-based suite of wellness programming for student-athletes

Wellness programming should be a top priority for all populations, including student-athletes. Targeted wellness programming for student-athletes is essential as they are under pressure to perform as both a student and an athlete successfully. Attention needs to be given to student-athlete wellness to support the unique pressures and challenges that student-athletes face. In the role of student-athletes, social and behavioral norms, expectancies, and intentions vary. To address these differences in roles, myPlaybook provides programming that provides specific strategies to promote the health and well-being of student-athletes. myPlaybook offers topics on mental health, stress management, alcohol and other drugs, nutrition, time management, and more. myPlaybook is equipped with engaging content and personalized feedback to support student-athletes as they navigate college as both a student and an athlete.
Advised by: Dr. David L. Wyrick
HumanitiesJonathanBairdHistoryDr.CharlesBoltonMelungeon History and Research Website Projecthttps://youtu.be/jgh_Gal0JEsThe creation and maintenance of a research database of primary source material dedicated to the research and understanding of Melungeon groups with Southern Appalachia. The Melungeons formed tri-racial and multi-racial endogamous and isolated communities in Appalachia in the early 19th century. The secretive nature of Melungeon communities led to an interest in their "mysterious" origins. This database seeks to provide those interested in Melungeon history a starting point for study.Jonathan Baird
History
In collaboration with: Dr. Charles Bolton
Melungeon History and Research Website Project

The creation and maintenance of a research database of primary source material dedicated to the research and understanding of Melungeon groups with Southern Appalachia. The Melungeons formed tri-racial and multi-racial endogamous and isolated communities in Appalachia in the early 19th century. The secretive nature of Melungeon communities led to an interest in their "mysterious" origins. This database seeks to provide those interested in Melungeon history a starting point for study.
Advised by: Dr. Charles Bolton
HumanitiesCatherineBowlinEnglishDr.KarenKilcupRace and the Environment in Children’s Literature: On the Making of A Digital Anthologyhttps://youtu.be/2YV2gLeg7AMIn Dr. Karen Kilcup's Literature and the Environment course, my classmates and I prepared a digital anthology of earlier American children's nature writing. The principal question I wanted to address was: how did children in early 20th-century America think and write about environmental topics, especially environmental justice?
In The Brownies’ Book, the first magazine published for African American children, authors encourage readers to reconsider environmental subjects. Editing, annotating, and publishing The Brownies’ Book selections has helped me illuminate how environmental justice was already emerging in the early 1900s.
The Brownies’ Book paved the way for our contemporary environmental justice movement and empowered young African American readers and writers by giving them agency. In fighting for environmental justice, we must prioritize the voices of marginalized people. Through my anthology pages’ selections, I amplify those voices – in an open-access format – to help advance social and environmental equity.
Catherine Bowlin
English
In collaboration with: Dr. Karen Kilcup
Race and the Environment in Children’s Literature: On the Making of A Digital Anthology

In Dr. Karen Kilcup's Literature and the Environment course, my classmates and I prepared a digital anthology of earlier American children's nature writing. The principal question I wanted to address was: how did children in early 20th-century America think and write about environmental topics, especially environmental justice?
In The Brownies’ Book, the first magazine published for African American children, authors encourage readers to reconsider environmental subjects. Editing, annotating, and publishing The Brownies’ Book selections has helped me illuminate how environmental justice was already emerging in the early 1900s.
The Brownies’ Book paved the way for our contemporary environmental justice movement and empowered young African American readers and writers by giving them agency. In fighting for environmental justice, we must prioritize the voices of marginalized people. Through my anthology pages’ selections, I amplify those voices – in an open-access format – to help advance social and environmental equity.
Advised by: Dr. Karen Kilcup
HumanitiesElizabethCarlinEnglishDr.KarenWeylerVoices from the Forecastle: The Collective Yarn of Richard Henry Dana’s Two Years Before the Masthttps://youtu.be/kWhvOSDe0Z4Richard Henry Dana’s 1840 memoir, Two Years Before the Mast, is part of a long tradition in American literature of sailors telling stories about their work—spinning “yarns” is an important part of the sailor’s cultural identity. The work itself, and the way of life that supports it, seem to compel narrative. But the nature of the sailor’s work also complicates the expected narrator—the “I”—with an account of experiences that are shared with shipmates—the “we”. How does the sailor-writer understand his own identity and authority, and how does this understanding shape the story? Elizabeth Carlin
English
In collaboration with: Dr. Karen Weyler
Voices from the Forecastle: The Collective Yarn of Richard Henry Dana’s Two Years Before the Mast

Richard Henry Dana’s 1840 memoir, Two Years Before the Mast, is part of a long tradition in American literature of sailors telling stories about their work—spinning “yarns” is an important part of the sailor’s cultural identity. The work itself, and the way of life that supports it, seem to compel narrative. But the nature of the sailor’s work also complicates the expected narrator—the “I”—with an account of experiences that are shared with shipmates—the “we”. How does the sailor-writer understand his own identity and authority, and how does this understanding shape the story?
Advised by: Dr. Karen Weyler
HumanitiesJessicaCoryEnglishDr.KarenKilcup"First Efforts at Rhyming" and Native American Historyhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XujjfbXzleIThis work was created as part of a class-wide project for Dr. Karen Kilcup's Literature and the Environment graduate course during Fall 2020, in which we worked with digitally archived primary sources to locate and recover 19th and early 20th century children's environmental literature. Our findings curated the content of an open-access website for scholars, educators, and non-academic readers. As a PhD student focusing on Native American literature under the direction of Dr. Mark Rifkin, I chose to work with children's environmental literatures created by Indigenous (mostly Native American) writers or works having to do with particular Native tribes. Not only are the original works transcribed on the website, but information on contexts, pedagogy, contemporary connections, author biographies, and resources for further study are also included. This additional information allows readers to engage more fully with the texts regardless of their educational pursuits or backgrounds.Jessica Cory
English
In collaboration with: Dr. Karen Kilcup
"First Efforts at Rhyming" and Native American History

This work was created as part of a class-wide project for Dr. Karen Kilcup's Literature and the Environment graduate course during Fall 2020, in which we worked with digitally archived primary sources to locate and recover 19th and early 20th century children's environmental literature. Our findings curated the content of an open-access website for scholars, educators, and non-academic readers. As a PhD student focusing on Native American literature under the direction of Dr. Mark Rifkin, I chose to work with children's environmental literatures created by Indigenous (mostly Native American) writers or works having to do with particular Native tribes. Not only are the original works transcribed on the website, but information on contexts, pedagogy, contemporary connections, author biographies, and resources for further study are also included. This additional information allows readers to engage more fully with the texts regardless of their educational pursuits or backgrounds.
Advised by: Dr. Karen Kilcup
HumanitiesStaceyGarrepyMusic EducationDr.ConstanceMcKoyParadigms of International Exchange in Music Education: Germany and the United Stateshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vyq7TkpHJl4In our increasingly connected world, a free exchange of ideas with other cultures is needed, particularly in music education. Exchange of educational ideas has been going on for years between countries such as the United States and Germany. Unfortunately, international exchange has also gone on in an uncritical way. Assumptions wrapped up in language, terminology, culture and philosophy have gone unchallenged in the literature, and English-language Anglo-American thought processes have dominated the conversation about music teaching, leaving German music education somewhat isolated. In this study, I wanted to know how this exchange could be done in a way that would go beyond surface level translation issues and into a deeper, more equitable understanding of what each side is teaching in music and how, hoping ultimately to open the door toward a culturally sensitive international exchange in music education.Stacey Garrepy
Music Education
In collaboration with: Dr. Constance McKoy
Paradigms of International Exchange in Music Education: Germany and the United States

In our increasingly connected world, a free exchange of ideas with other cultures is needed, particularly in music education. Exchange of educational ideas has been going on for years between countries such as the United States and Germany. Unfortunately, international exchange has also gone on in an uncritical way. Assumptions wrapped up in language, terminology, culture and philosophy have gone unchallenged in the literature, and English-language Anglo-American thought processes have dominated the conversation about music teaching, leaving German music education somewhat isolated. In this study, I wanted to know how this exchange could be done in a way that would go beyond surface level translation issues and into a deeper, more equitable understanding of what each side is teaching in music and how, hoping ultimately to open the door toward a culturally sensitive international exchange in music education.
Advised by: Dr. Constance McKoy
HumanitiesConnorHarneyHistoryDr.ThomasJacksonJeff Jackson, Warren Milteer, Jr. Past the Postindustrial Societyhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szqpeo3pDmELooking to synthesize the economic history of the long-1970s with labor history, I will present an account of de-industrialization, automation, and globalization, alongside the ways these seemingly abstract forces shaped the everyday lives of workers at the same time that those same workers sought to control them. In doing so, I hope to expose the myth of the postindustrial society or idea economy born in the heady days of postwar affluence.Connor Harney
History
In collaboration with: Jeff Jackson, Warren Milteer, Jr. , Dr. Thomas Jackson
Past the Postindustrial Society

Looking to synthesize the economic history of the long-1970s with labor history, I will present an account of de-industrialization, automation, and globalization, alongside the ways these seemingly abstract forces shaped the everyday lives of workers at the same time that those same workers sought to control them. In doing so, I hope to expose the myth of the postindustrial society or idea economy born in the heady days of postwar affluence.
Advised by: Dr. Thomas Jackson
HumanitiesSarah AnneMaskeHistory/Museum StudiesDr.TorrenGatsonTightly Woven: The East White Oak Mill Village Public History Projecthttps://youtu.be/-N7cEv9g91wThe East White Oak Mill Village Public History Project is an effort to research, curate, and design a two-room exhibit for the East White Oak Community Center in Greensboro, North Carolina. The exhibit examines the history of the East White Oak Mill Village and the African American textile workers’ experience. Built in 1916, the East White Oak Community Center, formally the East White Oak School is the last original structure from the Cone Mills’ only African American Mill Village, and a registered site on the National Register of Historic Places. Visitors will explore this exhibit to learn about the development of East White Oak’s close-knit community and its impact on the lives of its residents, the Cone Mills Corporation, and Greensboro. The project creates a space for intergenerational groups to have a community dialogue about Greensboro textile history, paternalism, segregation, and the legacy of the East White Oak Mill Village.Sarah Anne Maske
History/Museum Studies
In collaboration with: Dr. Torren Gatson
Tightly Woven: The East White Oak Mill Village Public History Project

The East White Oak Mill Village Public History Project is an effort to research, curate, and design a two-room exhibit for the East White Oak Community Center in Greensboro, North Carolina. The exhibit examines the history of the East White Oak Mill Village and the African American textile workers’ experience. Built in 1916, the East White Oak Community Center, formally the East White Oak School is the last original structure from the Cone Mills’ only African American Mill Village, and a registered site on the National Register of Historic Places. Visitors will explore this exhibit to learn about the development of East White Oak’s close-knit community and its impact on the lives of its residents, the Cone Mills Corporation, and Greensboro. The project creates a space for intergenerational groups to have a community dialogue about Greensboro textile history, paternalism, segregation, and the legacy of the East White Oak Mill Village.
Advised by: Dr. Torren Gatson
HumanitiesSomerMatthewsSpecialized Education ServicesDr.DianeRyndakSexual Education and Sexuality: A Call to Actionhttps://youtu.be/YLOkOv-Z36kIndividuals with intellectual disabilities are 7 times more likely to be sexually abused than their nondisabled peers, and this statistic is even higher if they are women. Further, the WHO defines sexuality as a central part of being human. Despite these facts, this population of students is routinely denied their right to sexuality and sexual education, and are often deliberately misinformed to keep them from engaging in sexual activity. In this presentation, I will give some firsthand examples about sexuality and sexual education for this population and explain why this is such an important issue that needs to be addressed.Somer Matthews
Specialized Education Services
In collaboration with: Dr. Diane Ryndak
Sexual Education and Sexuality: A Call to Action

Individuals with intellectual disabilities are 7 times more likely to be sexually abused than their nondisabled peers, and this statistic is even higher if they are women. Further, the WHO defines sexuality as a central part of being human. Despite these facts, this population of students is routinely denied their right to sexuality and sexual education, and are often deliberately misinformed to keep them from engaging in sexual activity. In this presentation, I will give some firsthand examples about sexuality and sexual education for this population and explain why this is such an important issue that needs to be addressed.
Advised by: Dr. Diane Ryndak
HumanitiesMaiziePlumleyHistoryDr.TorrenGatsonThere is a Story Every Day: The Children’s Home Society of West Virginiahttps://youtu.be/2ldpW_9nX2EWorking with the Children’s Home Society of West Virginia and alongside Mary White, CHSWV’s Chief Operations Officer, other administrative and management staff, and their board of directors, “There is a Story Every Day” shares the history of CHSWV by highlighting their archival material. The Children’s Home Society of West Virginia is a private, non-profit child welfare organization that offers child welfare, behavioral health, social casework, and advocacy services from thirteen primary locations across the State of West Virginia. Founded in 1896, the Children’s Home Society of WV’s mission “has been to promote the well-being of all West Virginia children.” This project aims to preserve the delicate photos and records gathered over the years through archival digitization and the creation of a virtual exhibit and portable exhibit panels.Maizie Plumley
History
In collaboration with: Dr. Torren Gatson
There is a Story Every Day: The Children’s Home Society of West Virginia

Working with the Children’s Home Society of West Virginia and alongside Mary White, CHSWV’s Chief Operations Officer, other administrative and management staff, and their board of directors, “There is a Story Every Day” shares the history of CHSWV by highlighting their archival material. The Children’s Home Society of West Virginia is a private, non-profit child welfare organization that offers child welfare, behavioral health, social casework, and advocacy services from thirteen primary locations across the State of West Virginia. Founded in 1896, the Children’s Home Society of WV’s mission “has been to promote the well-being of all West Virginia children.” This project aims to preserve the delicate photos and records gathered over the years through archival digitization and the creation of a virtual exhibit and portable exhibit panels.
Advised by: Dr. Torren Gatson
HumanitiesSaganThackerLibrary and Information ScienceDr.ColinPostAnarchy in the Archive! A Review, Study, and Some Ideas for the Future of Anarchist Archiveshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDq8jbyJczMThere are many anarchist community archives around the world, run cooperatively by anarchists and containing a great deal of rare archival material relating to anarchists and anarchism. This study examines the current status of anarchist community archives worldwide, including both physical and online archives, and brings to light several initiatives and ideas for greater cooperation and mutual aid among the anarchist archives. An appendix includes a list of currently active anarchist archives and ways to access their material.Sagan Thacker
Library and Information Science
In collaboration with: Dr. Colin Post
Anarchy in the Archive! A Review, Study, and Some Ideas for the Future of Anarchist Archives

There are many anarchist community archives around the world, run cooperatively by anarchists and containing a great deal of rare archival material relating to anarchists and anarchism. This study examines the current status of anarchist community archives worldwide, including both physical and online archives, and brings to light several initiatives and ideas for greater cooperation and mutual aid among the anarchist archives. An appendix includes a list of currently active anarchist archives and ways to access their material.
Advised by: Dr. Colin Post
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesRomesh Ruwan ThanujaAthuruliye Liyana ArachchigeMathematics and StatisticsDr.HaimengZhangThe Wavelet-Galerkin Method on Global Random Processeshttps://youtu.be/nkYUuht32lUOne of the main usages of covariance function or kernel is to capture the spatial or temporal dependency of a random process or random field. Covariance functions have been widely used in many areas such as environmental statistics, economics, machine learning, atmospheric sciences, imaging analysis, etc. Hence, the understanding of a covariance function is crucial to the modeling, estimation, and prediction of a random process. As the first part of the project, based on Mercer's theorem, we developed an algorithm that uses the Wavelet-Galerkin method to approximate covariance functions. In the second part, we apply the proposed algorithm to implement the Karhunen-Lo\'eve expansion for studying axially symmetric Gaussian random processes on the sphere. We propose an efficient algorithm to generate axially symmetric Gaussian data on the sphere with a given covariance structure.Romesh Ruwan Thanuja Athuruliye Liyana Arachchige
Mathematics and Statistics
In collaboration with: Dr. Haimeng Zhang
The Wavelet-Galerkin Method on Global Random Processes

One of the main usages of covariance function or kernel is to capture the spatial or temporal dependency of a random process or random field. Covariance functions have been widely used in many areas such as environmental statistics, economics, machine learning, atmospheric sciences, imaging analysis, etc. Hence, the understanding of a covariance function is crucial to the modeling, estimation, and prediction of a random process. As the first part of the project, based on Mercer's theorem, we developed an algorithm that uses the Wavelet-Galerkin method to approximate covariance functions. In the second part, we apply the proposed algorithm to implement the Karhunen-Lo\'eve expansion for studying axially symmetric Gaussian random processes on the sphere. We propose an efficient algorithm to generate axially symmetric Gaussian data on the sphere with a given covariance structure.
Advised by: Dr. Haimeng Zhang
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesShalmaliBandyopadhyayMathematics and StatisticsDr.MayaChhetriDifferential Equation with Nonlinear Boundary Conditionhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDUU0lE4I4cWe consider a differential equation motivated by the limb development in mammals due to cell growth and cell division. We discuss the existence of a positive solution of such differential equations with respect to a parameter related to the scale of the domain.Shalmali Bandyopadhyay
Mathematics and Statistics
In collaboration with: Dr. Maya Chhetri
Differential Equation with Nonlinear Boundary Condition

We consider a differential equation motivated by the limb development in mammals due to cell growth and cell division. We discuss the existence of a positive solution of such differential equations with respect to a parameter related to the scale of the domain.
Advised by: Dr. Maya Chhetri
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesAnsleiFosterBiologyDr.David LRemingtonCharacterization of Genetic Mechanisms Influencing Perenniality Variation in Arabidopsis lyratahttps://youtu.be/CqKeTDv5giUThe goal of this project is to determine the molecular basis of adaptive variation involving perenniality in Arabidopsis lyrata. Rock cress A. lyrata populations grow in warm versus cold climates and are highly differentiated along a perenniality continuum. Previous research suggests that genetic variation in the allocation of nutrient and meristems is the main contributor to perenniality and contributes to local adaptation. The proposed research has two primary objectives: (1) To examine the genetic basis of lateral shoot development in Arabidopsis lyrata. (2) To investigate perenniality genes’ effect on annuality in A. thaliana. Objective (1) will be addressed by using CRISPR to generate parallel candidate-gene deletions and reciprocal hemizygosity tests of candidate genes to evaluate effects on perenniality. Objective (2) will be addressed by using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to see if perenniality genes from A. lyrata make A. thaliana perennial in order to gain insight into perennial life history.Anslei Foster
Biology
In collaboration with: Dr. David L Remington
Characterization of Genetic Mechanisms Influencing Perenniality Variation in Arabidopsis lyrata

The goal of this project is to determine the molecular basis of adaptive variation involving perenniality in Arabidopsis lyrata. Rock cress A. lyrata populations grow in warm versus cold climates and are highly differentiated along a perenniality continuum. Previous research suggests that genetic variation in the allocation of nutrient and meristems is the main contributor to perenniality and contributes to local adaptation. The proposed research has two primary objectives: (1) To examine the genetic basis of lateral shoot development in Arabidopsis lyrata. (2) To investigate perenniality genes’ effect on annuality in A. thaliana. Objective (1) will be addressed by using CRISPR to generate parallel candidate-gene deletions and reciprocal hemizygosity tests of candidate genes to evaluate effects on perenniality. Objective (2) will be addressed by using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to see if perenniality genes from A. lyrata make A. thaliana perennial in order to gain insight into perennial life history.
Advised by: Dr. David L Remington
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesJoshFrostChemistry and BiochemistryDr.KimberlyPetersenAmber Kelley, Kala YoungbloodLactones and Lactams via Nitriles: Novel Stereoselective Applications of the Pinner Reactionhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yQNTSO80rcThe body is a chiral environment – the molecules that make up every living organism are like your hands. You have two hands that are mirror images of each other, and no matter how you rotate them they cannot be superimposed over each other. Organic molecules, like certain drugs, can have this property. Much like a right hand cannot fit into an opposite handed glove, chiral molecules can interact preferentially with other chiral molecules. When taking certain medicines, one chiral “hand” of the active molecule can have beneficial effects, while the other “hand” can cause horrible side effects. The Petersen lab works in asymmetric methodological synthesis – developing methods to make one specific molecular “hand. This work furthers development of methods for synthesis of asymmetric lactones and lactams. Development of these methods serves to broaden our understanding of organic chemistry and can potentially result in access to safer and more targeted medicines.Josh Frost
Chemistry and Biochemistry
In collaboration with: Amber Kelley, Kala Youngblood, Dr. Kimberly Petersen
Lactones and Lactams via Nitriles: Novel Stereoselective Applications of the Pinner Reaction

The body is a chiral environment – the molecules that make up every living organism are like your hands. You have two hands that are mirror images of each other, and no matter how you rotate them they cannot be superimposed over each other. Organic molecules, like certain drugs, can have this property. Much like a right hand cannot fit into an opposite handed glove, chiral molecules can interact preferentially with other chiral molecules. When taking certain medicines, one chiral “hand” of the active molecule can have beneficial effects, while the other “hand” can cause horrible side effects. The Petersen lab works in asymmetric methodological synthesis – developing methods to make one specific molecular “hand. This work furthers development of methods for synthesis of asymmetric lactones and lactams. Development of these methods serves to broaden our understanding of organic chemistry and can potentially result in access to safer and more targeted medicines.
Advised by: Dr. Kimberly Petersen
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesMorganFrostBiologyDr.Sally E.KoernerImplications from soil to insect communities of an invasive brome grass in native rangeland communitieshttps://youtu.be/fbJn20Ix4ecInvasive species harm biodiversity and ecosystem services, threatening the integrity of native ecosystems. Mixed grass prairies, invaluable for their utility as working rangelands, are susceptible to damage from invasive plants. Currently, however, the effects of invasive grasses across trophic levels in rangelands is not well understood. In this multi-year field experiment, we assessed how Bromus arvensis, a well-established invasive brome grass across US rangelands, changes the native plant, insect, and soil microbial communities across gradients of invasion. To do this, we established invasion gradients spanning three invasion levels – low, moderate, and high – and analyzed differences across trophic levels before and after B. arvensis removal. Here, we present preliminary results from pre-treatment sampling. We conclude that rangeland communities respond to invasion, with a larger response seen under high invasion compared to low invasion. In particular, native plant richness decreases with increasing invasion, which has important implications for forage availability for cattle.Morgan Frost
Biology
In collaboration with: Dr. Sally E. Koerner
Implications from soil to insect communities of an invasive brome grass in native rangeland communities

Invasive species harm biodiversity and ecosystem services, threatening the integrity of native ecosystems. Mixed grass prairies, invaluable for their utility as working rangelands, are susceptible to damage from invasive plants. Currently, however, the effects of invasive grasses across trophic levels in rangelands is not well understood. In this multi-year field experiment, we assessed how Bromus arvensis, a well-established invasive brome grass across US rangelands, changes the native plant, insect, and soil microbial communities across gradients of invasion. To do this, we established invasion gradients spanning three invasion levels – low, moderate, and high – and analyzed differences across trophic levels before and after B. arvensis removal. Here, we present preliminary results from pre-treatment sampling. We conclude that rangeland communities respond to invasion, with a larger response seen under high invasion compared to low invasion. In particular, native plant richness decreases with increasing invasion, which has important implications for forage availability for cattle.
Advised by: Dr. Sally E. Koerner
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesGabriellaGajeBiologyDr.ZhenquanJiaAnastasia Romanov, Robert Y. Li, Hong ZhuThe In vivo role of 3H-1,2-Dithiole-3-Thione in Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Injuryhttps://youtu.be/r0b0yigEQDASepsis is defined as being a storm of inflammation induced by infection. The bacterial endotoxin known as LPS is critical in triggering septic shock, making it widely used for studies to understand systemic inflammation mimicking the inflammatory storm in human sepsis. 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) is a common dithiolethione that has been effective as an anti-inflammatory agent in cancers and other diseases. However, it is not known if the use of D3T can reduce LPS-induced oxidative and inflammatory responses. This study aimed to examine the effect of D3T on LPS-induced expressions of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory genes in vivo and whether LPS toxicity can be ameliorated by D3T. In vivo mice trials indicated that the administration of LPS showed a significant increase in expression of pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) in liver tissues. There was a significant decrease in IL-6 and MCP-1 expression with the administration of D3T. Results indicate that D3T could be used as a potential therapeutic to target inflammatory responses caused by sepsis.Gabriella Gaje
Biology
In collaboration with: Anastasia Romanov, Robert Y. Li, Hong Zhu, Dr. Zhenquan Jia
The In vivo role of 3H-1,2-Dithiole-3-Thione in Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Injury

Sepsis is defined as being a storm of inflammation induced by infection. The bacterial endotoxin known as LPS is critical in triggering septic shock, making it widely used for studies to understand systemic inflammation mimicking the inflammatory storm in human sepsis. 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) is a common dithiolethione that has been effective as an anti-inflammatory agent in cancers and other diseases. However, it is not known if the use of D3T can reduce LPS-induced oxidative and inflammatory responses. This study aimed to examine the effect of D3T on LPS-induced expressions of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory genes in vivo and whether LPS toxicity can be ameliorated by D3T. In vivo mice trials indicated that the administration of LPS showed a significant increase in expression of pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) in liver tissues. There was a significant decrease in IL-6 and MCP-1 expression with the administration of D3T. Results indicate that D3T could be used as a potential therapeutic to target inflammatory responses caused by sepsis.
Advised by: Dr. Zhenquan Jia
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesReubenGarshongBiologyDr.GideonWasserbergThe Role of Topographic Corridors in the Spread of Lyme Disease from Virginia to North Carolinahttps://youtu.be/6jtYLKaKNSoLyme disease (LD) is the most common tick-borne disease in the US, plaguing an estimated 300,000 people each year. Borrelia burgdorferi, a bacterium, is the pathogen (disease-causing microorganism) that causes the disease. In the eastern US, the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) transmits the disease. Recent reports indicated rising Lyme disease cases in the New River Valley area. We hypothesized that the New River is serving as a corridor that is facilitating the spread of the disease. We collected ticks along the New River from Pulaski county, Virginia (VA), to Burke county, North Carolina (NC). As a control, ticks were collected away from the New River, from Bedford county, VA, to Iredell county, NC. These collected ticks were tested for Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Our results indicated that the New River may be facilitating the spread of the ticks and their associated pathogen from the LD endemic state, VA, into neighboring NC.Reuben Garshong
Biology
In collaboration with: Dr. Gideon Wasserberg
The Role of Topographic Corridors in the Spread of Lyme Disease from Virginia to North Carolina

Lyme disease (LD) is the most common tick-borne disease in the US, plaguing an estimated 300,000 people each year. Borrelia burgdorferi, a bacterium, is the pathogen (disease-causing microorganism) that causes the disease. In the eastern US, the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) transmits the disease. Recent reports indicated rising Lyme disease cases in the New River Valley area. We hypothesized that the New River is serving as a corridor that is facilitating the spread of the disease. We collected ticks along the New River from Pulaski county, Virginia (VA), to Burke county, North Carolina (NC). As a control, ticks were collected away from the New River, from Bedford county, VA, to Iredell county, NC. These collected ticks were tested for Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Our results indicated that the New River may be facilitating the spread of the ticks and their associated pathogen from the LD endemic state, VA, into neighboring NC.
Advised by: Dr. Gideon Wasserberg
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesSarahGoraBiologyDr.Sally E.KoernerBelowground trait responses to chronic nutrient addition in tallgrass prairiehttps://youtu.be/fS3WyeQQ-QcAnthropogenic effects are pervasive, ignoring country and even conservation boundaries, including nitrogen deposition which alters nutrient limitation with cascading consequences for biodiversity and ecosystem function. This project investigates the effect of nitrogen addition on belowground plant traits, which are underexplored due to the unique challenges of studying them, yet are critical for understanding important processes such as carbon sequestration. Specifically, I will take advantage of three long-term and on-going nutrient addition experiments at the Konza Long-term Ecological Research Site in Manhattan, Kansas. Using these platforms, I will explore how nitrogen addition affects belowground traits of six different plant species in the tallgrass prairie community over a six-week data collection period, sampling each species at its peak flowering time. Understanding the relationship between plant traits and certain variables like nitrogen addition will help improve our ability to predict future response to global change drivers.Sarah Gora
Biology
In collaboration with: Dr. Sally E. Koerner
Belowground trait responses to chronic nutrient addition in tallgrass prairie

Anthropogenic effects are pervasive, ignoring country and even conservation boundaries, including nitrogen deposition which alters nutrient limitation with cascading consequences for biodiversity and ecosystem function. This project investigates the effect of nitrogen addition on belowground plant traits, which are underexplored due to the unique challenges of studying them, yet are critical for understanding important processes such as carbon sequestration. Specifically, I will take advantage of three long-term and on-going nutrient addition experiments at the Konza Long-term Ecological Research Site in Manhattan, Kansas. Using these platforms, I will explore how nitrogen addition affects belowground traits of six different plant species in the tallgrass prairie community over a six-week data collection period, sampling each species at its peak flowering time. Understanding the relationship between plant traits and certain variables like nitrogen addition will help improve our ability to predict future response to global change drivers.
Advised by: Dr. Sally E. Koerner
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesSajedehPourianejadNanoscienceDr.TetyanaIgnatovaJared Averitt, Olubukola Ayanbajo, Shyam AravamudhanWork function modulation in 2D MoS2https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzShp3zFassTwo-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has drawn a lot of attention due to its tunable electrical and optical properties, resulting in various applications such as field-effect transistors, and photodetectors. Importantly, the intrinsic optical properties could be enhanced by modifying the electronic structure of the 2D MoS2 with proper doping. Doping results in the charge transfer and the Fermi level shift, leading to a work function (WF) modulation. A comprehensive analysis of the electronic band structure and control over the WF of 2D components are crucial, resulting in better performance of potential devices. Here, we focus on the study of the band alignment of 2D MoS2 before and after doping. To ascertain the MoS2 layer number and defects, confocal Raman spectroscopy and Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were conducted. The sample thickness was determined by atomic force microscopy measurement. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the surface morphologies of MoS2. To investigate work function and charge-related phenomena on surfaces, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was carried out. In conclusion, we found that the adsorption of p-dopant by 2D MoS2 resulted in a factor ~ 2 enhancement of the PL signal because of switching between trions and excitons. In addition, the Fermi level downshift led the WF to increase by ~150meVSajedeh Pourianejad
Nanoscience
In collaboration with: Jared Averitt, Olubukola Ayanbajo, Shyam Aravamudhan, Dr. Tetyana Ignatova
Work function modulation in 2D MoS2

Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has drawn a lot of attention due to its tunable electrical and optical properties, resulting in various applications such as field-effect transistors, and photodetectors. Importantly, the intrinsic optical properties could be enhanced by modifying the electronic structure of the 2D MoS2 with proper doping. Doping results in the charge transfer and the Fermi level shift, leading to a work function (WF) modulation. A comprehensive analysis of the electronic band structure and control over the WF of 2D components are crucial, resulting in better performance of potential devices. Here, we focus on the study of the band alignment of 2D MoS2 before and after doping. To ascertain the MoS2 layer number and defects, confocal Raman spectroscopy and Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were conducted. The sample thickness was determined by atomic force microscopy measurement. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the surface morphologies of MoS2. To investigate work function and charge-related phenomena on surfaces, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was carried out. In conclusion, we found that the adsorption of p-dopant by 2D MoS2 resulted in a factor ~ 2 enhancement of the PL signal because of switching between trions and excitons. In addition, the Fermi level downshift led the WF to increase by ~150meV
Advised by: Dr. Tetyana Ignatova
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesSujoySahaNanoscienceDr.HemaliRathnayakeHeavy metal extraction from water by the filtration with Iron-Tannic Acid Complexhttps://youtu.be/AG6T1PXRNFMWater purification by the removal of heavy metals is one of the most challenging fields of scientific research. In natural waters, heavy metals are generally present in trace amounts but most of them have a wide range of hazardous and detrimental effects to the human body even at very low concentrations. Heavy metals especially lead, and cadmium can cause severe health effects including cancer, nervous system damage, organ damage, and in extreme cases, death. Thus, it is very important to extract heavy metal from industrial wastewater along with drinking water. In this research, we used the Iron-Tannic Acid complex for the filtration of water and could successfully extract Pb2+, Cd2+, and Ag+ cations from different water samples containing those heavy metals. Among all of the heavy metal filtration materials, the Iron-Tannic Acid complex has the greatest potential in heavy-metal extraction processes for future applications.Sujoy Saha
Nanoscience
In collaboration with: Dr. Hemali Rathnayake
Heavy metal extraction from water by the filtration with Iron-Tannic Acid Complex

Water purification by the removal of heavy metals is one of the most challenging fields of scientific research. In natural waters, heavy metals are generally present in trace amounts but most of them have a wide range of hazardous and detrimental effects to the human body even at very low concentrations. Heavy metals especially lead, and cadmium can cause severe health effects including cancer, nervous system damage, organ damage, and in extreme cases, death. Thus, it is very important to extract heavy metal from industrial wastewater along with drinking water. In this research, we used the Iron-Tannic Acid complex for the filtration of water and could successfully extract Pb2+, Cd2+, and Ag+ cations from different water samples containing those heavy metals. Among all of the heavy metal filtration materials, the Iron-Tannic Acid complex has the greatest potential in heavy-metal extraction processes for future applications.
Advised by: Dr. Hemali Rathnayake
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesKalaniThalagodaMathematics and StatisticsDr.DanYasakiJourney to a land of infinite symmetryhttps://youtu.be/VkkNQdQgPOsThe land of Modular Forms is a land of infinite symmetry where Topology, Analysis, and Number Theory meet in perfect harmony. Barry Mazur famously said, "They (Modular forms) satisfy so many internal symmetries that their mere existence seem like accidents." Luckily, they do exist and are important tools to prove beautiful mathematical results such as Fermat's last theorem. In this talk, I will demonstrate with explicit examples the beauty of Modular Forms and the importance of the role they play in Number Theory.Kalani Thalagoda
Mathematics and Statistics
In collaboration with: Dr. Dan Yasaki
Journey to a land of infinite symmetry

The land of Modular Forms is a land of infinite symmetry where Topology, Analysis, and Number Theory meet in perfect harmony. Barry Mazur famously said, "They (Modular forms) satisfy so many internal symmetries that their mere existence seem like accidents." Luckily, they do exist and are important tools to prove beautiful mathematical results such as Fermat's last theorem. In this talk, I will demonstrate with explicit examples the beauty of Modular Forms and the importance of the role they play in Number Theory.
Advised by: Dr. Dan Yasaki
Natural, Physical, and Mathematical SciencesPrashantWaikerBiologyDr.OlavRueppellGenome diversity in highly social stingless beeshttps://youtu.be/nrS9TfnuBcMSocial insects live in organized colonies where thousands of individuals share the same nest. Evolution of such social living is influenced by many factors, including a biological process called meiotic recombination. Limited studies have revealed that the rate of meiotic recombination in the social insect is several times higher than non-social organisms. High recombination is thought to facilitate social evolution in these insects. In my research, I genotyped over 9000 genetic positions across genome in 180 stingless bees from Brazil and performed a genetic analysis - linkage mapping - to test the hypothesis that recombination rate is high in this group of social insects. In agreement to previous research, I found that recombination rate is high in stingless bees. This result suggests that elevated recombination in highly social insects is universal and indicates the importance of genome diversity in evolution of sociality.Prashant Waiker
Biology
In collaboration with: Dr. Olav Rueppell
Genome diversity in highly social stingless bees

Social insects live in organized colonies where thousands of individuals share the same nest. Evolution of such social living is influenced by many factors, including a biological process called meiotic recombination. Limited studies have revealed that the rate of meiotic recombination in the social insect is several times higher than non-social organisms. High recombination is thought to facilitate social evolution in these insects. In my research, I genotyped over 9000 genetic positions across genome in 180 stingless bees from Brazil and performed a genetic analysis - linkage mapping - to test the hypothesis that recombination rate is high in this group of social insects. In agreement to previous research, I found that recombination rate is high in stingless bees. This result suggests that elevated recombination in highly social insects is universal and indicates the importance of genome diversity in evolution of sociality.
Advised by: Dr. Olav Rueppell
Social SciencesJ'naiAdamsHigher EducationDr.Laura M.GonzalezMaking Our Own Way: Exploring the Experiences of Mid-level Black Womxn Student Affairs Professionals Thriving at Southern HWI'shttps://youtu.be/WTyMqD614QUThis phenomenological study explores ten mid-level Black womxn student affairs professionals’ ability to thrive at southern Historically White Institutions (HWIs). Thriving is explored through navigation, community, and onboarding. Participants worked in various functional areas and institutional types. The theoretical frameworks used were critical race theory and Black feminist thought.

The researcher found that the majority of the participants were thriving in some capacity at their institution; however, their sense of thriving came from self-definition, community support, faith and spirituality, external resources, and onboarding conducted either by participants, from professional organizations, or other Black womxn colleagues. Implications and recommendations from this study impact not only creating a more inclusive and thereby supportive environment for mid-level Black womxn working in White spaces but also places accountability on HWIs and non-Black colleagues to do self-work and create actionable steps to create an environment that fosters mid-level Black womxn’s ability to thrive.
, IRB# 20-0500J'nai Adams
Higher Education
In collaboration with: Dr. Laura M. Gonzalez
Making Our Own Way: Exploring the Experiences of Mid-level Black Womxn Student Affairs Professionals Thriving at Southern HWI's

This phenomenological study explores ten mid-level Black womxn student affairs professionals’ ability to thrive at southern Historically White Institutions (HWIs). Thriving is explored through navigation, community, and onboarding. Participants worked in various functional areas and institutional types. The theoretical frameworks used were critical race theory and Black feminist thought.

The researcher found that the majority of the participants were thriving in some capacity at their institution; however, their sense of thriving came from self-definition, community support, faith and spirituality, external resources, and onboarding conducted either by participants, from professional organizations, or other Black womxn colleagues. Implications and recommendations from this study impact not only creating a more inclusive and thereby supportive environment for mid-level Black womxn working in White spaces but also places accountability on HWIs and non-Black colleagues to do self-work and create actionable steps to create an environment that fosters mid-level Black womxn’s ability to thrive.
Advised by: Dr. Laura M. Gonzalez
Social SciencesShelbyAndersonKinesiologyDr.DianeGillDeveloping a Sport Psychology Program to Support Women Sport Coacheshttps://youtu.be/QUdMGFfFTX4The percentage of women coaching in college athletics has significantly decreased over time. Prior to Title IX, women coached 90% of women’s sport teams, but currently women coach only 40% of women’s sport teams (EADA, 2020). This decreasing number is perplexing as many other professions (e.g., law, academia, medicine) have increased the number of women in positions of power over time (LaVoi, 2016). Scholars note numerous barriers faced by women coaches and call for research to move from a focus on barriers to a focus on supports (LaVoi, 2016). One potential support is sport psychology programming. While sport psychology programming has been used to promote athlete performance and well-being, it has yet to be utilized for sport coaches. The goal of this research is to develop a sport psychology program to support the unique needs of women sport coaches. This presentation includes discussion on research plans for program development.Shelby Anderson
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Dr. Diane Gill
Developing a Sport Psychology Program to Support Women Sport Coaches

The percentage of women coaching in college athletics has significantly decreased over time. Prior to Title IX, women coached 90% of women’s sport teams, but currently women coach only 40% of women’s sport teams (EADA, 2020). This decreasing number is perplexing as many other professions (e.g., law, academia, medicine) have increased the number of women in positions of power over time (LaVoi, 2016). Scholars note numerous barriers faced by women coaches and call for research to move from a focus on barriers to a focus on supports (LaVoi, 2016). One potential support is sport psychology programming. While sport psychology programming has been used to promote athlete performance and well-being, it has yet to be utilized for sport coaches. The goal of this research is to develop a sport psychology program to support the unique needs of women sport coaches. This presentation includes discussion on research plans for program development.
Advised by: Dr. Diane Gill
Social SciencesPankajBajracharyaGeography, Environment, and SustainabilityDr.SelimaSultanaKey Considerations for Potential Adoption of Urban Growth Boundary in Bangladesh: A case study of Chattogramhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NI3TOUhhSoYWith a rapid growth of urban footprint for the city of Chattogram, a potential adoption of Urban Growth Boundary (UGB) could provide robust planning strategy aimed at restricting and directing the rate of future urban growth of the city. However, the formulation and implementation of UGB is highly intertwined with the complex economic realities, social structure, and the political climate of Chattogram. This paper investigates the key considerations required for a successful implementation of UGB for Chattogram through a systematic literature review and a web-based survey of stakeholders’ perceptions on current growth patterns of Chattogram, potential application of UGB as containment strategy, and concerns regarding the application of UGB. While there has been an overall positive response regarding a potential adoption of UGB for Chattogram, this paper identifies five key concerns that would need to be addressed for the successful adoption and implementation of UGB for Chattogram.Pankaj Bajracharya
Geography, Environment, and Sustainability
In collaboration with: Dr. Selima Sultana
Key Considerations for Potential Adoption of Urban Growth Boundary in Bangladesh: A case study of Chattogram

With a rapid growth of urban footprint for the city of Chattogram, a potential adoption of Urban Growth Boundary (UGB) could provide robust planning strategy aimed at restricting and directing the rate of future urban growth of the city. However, the formulation and implementation of UGB is highly intertwined with the complex economic realities, social structure, and the political climate of Chattogram. This paper investigates the key considerations required for a successful implementation of UGB for Chattogram through a systematic literature review and a web-based survey of stakeholders’ perceptions on current growth patterns of Chattogram, potential application of UGB as containment strategy, and concerns regarding the application of UGB. While there has been an overall positive response regarding a potential adoption of UGB for Chattogram, this paper identifies five key concerns that would need to be addressed for the successful adoption and implementation of UGB for Chattogram.
Advised by: Dr. Selima Sultana
Social SciencesKaylaBakerEducational Leadership and Cultural FoundationsDr.LeilaVillaverdeWhy Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together? Understanding the Impact of Subcultures on Black College Studentshttps://youtu.be/S7BqWOfVtNQThis research examines the connection between Black student participation in subcultures, campus racial climate, and student success. Aiming to empower people to examine the benefits that result from Black students’ interactions within racially homogenous peer groups, this research highlights the role racial subcultures have in operating as a site of resistance to assimilation for Black students. The findings discuss the ways Black students utilize racial subcultures on campus and social media platforms to engage in community, racial identity expression, and agency., IRB# 21-0177Kayla Baker
Educational Leadership and Cultural Foundations
In collaboration with: Dr. Leila Villaverde
Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together? Understanding the Impact of Subcultures on Black College Students

This research examines the connection between Black student participation in subcultures, campus racial climate, and student success. Aiming to empower people to examine the benefits that result from Black students’ interactions within racially homogenous peer groups, this research highlights the role racial subcultures have in operating as a site of resistance to assimilation for Black students. The findings discuss the ways Black students utilize racial subcultures on campus and social media platforms to engage in community, racial identity expression, and agency.
Advised by: Dr. Leila Villaverde
Social SciencesAmandaBarnesHuman Development and Family StudiesDr.Danielle A.Crosby“Whoa! It has a lot of benefits”: Refugee Mothers’ Early Care and Education Perceptions and Preferenceshttps://youtu.be/_hT-xHdzUEwNearly half of the refugees resettling in the United States are families with children. Resettlement can be an overwhelming experience but early care and education (ECE) services have been found to help refugees integrate into their new communities. ECE participation has been known to influence school readiness skills and provide supportive benefits for families. Despite established benefits, refugee families are less likely to utilize ECE than U.S. born and other immigrant families. This study examined four refugee mothers’ ECE perceptions and preferences. Parents deemed ECE important and beneficial to the entire family and also preferred public ECE, caring teachers, and enriching environments. Understanding what parents value provides helpful information to ECE programs, resettlement agencies, and policymakers on why and how refugee families utilize ECE. This study is needed to recognize what matters most to refugee families to ensure that educational and policy institutions work to increase ECE access and utilization., IRB# 21-0145Amanda Barnes
Human Development and Family Studies
In collaboration with: Dr. Danielle A. Crosby
“Whoa! It has a lot of benefits”: Refugee Mothers’ Early Care and Education Perceptions and Preferences

Nearly half of the refugees resettling in the United States are families with children. Resettlement can be an overwhelming experience but early care and education (ECE) services have been found to help refugees integrate into their new communities. ECE participation has been known to influence school readiness skills and provide supportive benefits for families. Despite established benefits, refugee families are less likely to utilize ECE than U.S. born and other immigrant families. This study examined four refugee mothers’ ECE perceptions and preferences. Parents deemed ECE important and beneficial to the entire family and also preferred public ECE, caring teachers, and enriching environments. Understanding what parents value provides helpful information to ECE programs, resettlement agencies, and policymakers on why and how refugee families utilize ECE. This study is needed to recognize what matters most to refugee families to ensure that educational and policy institutions work to increase ECE access and utilization.
Advised by: Dr. Danielle A. Crosby
Social SciencesKelseyBittelKinesiologyDr.Jaclyn P.MaherRena RagagliaAssociations between Behavioral Cognitions and Physical Activity using Ecological Momentary Assessment: A Systematic Reviewhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXku62tLLmg&t=1sPhysical inactivity is directly linked to increased likelihood of non-communicable diseases like cardiovascular disease. Physical activity (PA) promotion efforts often focus on determinants thought to influence behavior known as behavioral cognitions. Behavioral cognitions refer to one’s thoughts about PA and/or their ability to engage in it (e.g., intentions, self-efficacy). Traditionally behavioral cognitions are considered stable, time-invariant constructs. However, accumulating evidence suggests that behavioral cognitions and PA behavior are dynamic and change within and across days. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) is a real-time data capture methodology that can capture behavioral cognitions and PA as they change throughout everyday life. Over the last decade EMA methodology has increased in PA research. This systematic review aims to summarize relations between behavioral cognitions and PA behaviors among studies using EMA. This review will identify trends among behavioral cognition-PA relations as well as identify knowledge gaps to be explored in future EMA research.Kelsey Bittel
Kinesiology
In collaboration with: Rena Ragaglia, Dr. Jaclyn P. Maher
Associations between Behavioral Cognitions and Physical Activity using Ecological Momentary Assessment: A Systematic Review

Physical inactivity is directly linked to increased likelihood of non-communicable diseases like cardiovascular disease. Physical activity (PA) promotion efforts often focus on determinants thought to influence behavior known as behavioral cognitions. Behavioral cognitions refer to one’s thoughts about PA and/or their ability to engage in it (e.g., intentions, self-efficacy). Traditionally behavioral cognitions are considered stable, time-invariant constructs. However, accumulating evidence suggests that behavioral cognitions and PA behavior are dynamic and change within and across days. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) is a real-time data capture methodology that can capture behavioral cognitions and PA as they change throughout everyday life. Over the last decade EMA methodology has increased in PA research. This systematic review aims to summarize relations between behavioral cognitions and PA behaviors among studies using EMA. This review will identify trends among behavioral cognition-PA relations as well as identify knowledge gaps to be explored in future EMA research.
Advised by: Dr. Jaclyn P. Maher
Social SciencesD. RoseEwaldPublic Health EducationDr.Robert W.StrackFactors Affecting Higher Education for Students with Disabilitieshttps://youtu.be/eVv3UEQOnIYFactors Affecting Higher Education for Students with Disabilities
Background: Students with disabilities face unique challenges in attending college and completing a degree. This study focused on factors affecting students with disabilities at 4-year universities.
Objective: The study compared experiences of students with and without disabilities at a mid-size southeastern university, regarding campus services/resources, campus climate, and how their experiences could be improved.
Methods: Data were collected with an IRB-approved anonymous online survey via the Disability Services Office (DSO: n = 688) and the Student Affairs Office (SAO: n = 3000).
Results: DSO and SAO response rates were 78 (11.3%) and 472 (15.7%), respectively. Responses indicated that the experiences of students with and without disabilities were significantly different. Students with disabilities reported more barriers to access/use of facilities, experienced more adverse interactions, and felt less supported.
Conclusion: To obtain a college education, students with disabilities must overcome barriers to academic success arising from prejudices about people with disabilities.
, IRB# 19-0422D. Rose Ewald
Public Health Education
In collaboration with: Dr. Robert W. Strack
Factors Affecting Higher Education for Students with Disabilities

Factors Affecting Higher Education for Students with Disabilities
Background: Students with disabilities face unique challenges in attending college and completing a degree. This study focused on factors affecting students with disabilities at 4-year universities.
Objective: The study compared experiences of students with and without disabilities at a mid-size southeastern university, regarding campus services/resources, campus climate, and how their experiences could be improved.
Methods: Data were collected with an IRB-approved anonymous online survey via the Disability Services Office (DSO: n = 688) and the Student Affairs Office (SAO: n = 3000).
Results: DSO and SAO response rates were 78 (11.3%) and 472 (15.7%), respectively. Responses indicated that the experiences of students with and without disabilities were significantly different. Students with disabilities reported more barriers to access/use of facilities, experienced more adverse interactions, and felt less supported.
Conclusion: To obtain a college education, students with disabilities must overcome barriers to academic success arising from prejudices about people with disabilities.
Advised by: Dr. Robert W. Strack
Social SciencesSabineHuberClinical PsychologyDr.SusanKeaneSusan Calkins, Lilly Shanahan, ,Jessica DollarThe Perfect Storm: Poor Sleep Amplifies Connection between Emotion Regulation and Anxiety in Adolescencehttps://youtu.be/BOdm14XJ77AThe current study examines whether the interaction between emotion regulation and sleep quality at age 15 is associated with anxious symptoms in late adolescence (age 17). Data for the present study comes from the RIGHT Track Project, a federally funded longitudinal study of emotional and social development following children between ages 2 and 17. Results from hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that sleep quality exacerbated the association between ER and later anxiety for children who don’t get adequate sleep, even after controlling for earlier anxiety. Given that mean sleep quality in the present sample was less severe than reports of average adolescent sleep quality, demonstration of an interaction effect between sleep and ER, even in less severe sleep quality deficits, suggests robustness in associations between ER, sleep and later anxiety. Results from the present study could inform intervention opportunities which teach emotion regulation and sleep hygiene skills to children to prevent future acquisition of anxious symptoms., IRB# 07-0194Sabine Huber
Clinical Psychology
In collaboration with: Susan Calkins, Lilly Shanahan, ,Jessica Dollar, Dr. Susan Keane
The Perfect Storm: Poor Sleep Amplifies Connection between Emotion Regulation and Anxiety in Adolescence

The current study examines whether the interaction between emotion regulation and sleep quality at age 15 is associated with anxious symptoms in late adolescence (age 17). Data for the present study comes from the RIGHT Track Project, a federally funded longitudinal study of emotional and social development following children between ages 2 and 17. Results from hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that sleep quality exacerbated the association between ER and later anxiety for children who don’t get adequate sleep, even after controlling for earlier anxiety. Given that mean sleep quality in the present sample was less severe than reports of average adolescent sleep quality, demonstration of an interaction effect between sleep and ER, even in less severe sleep quality deficits, suggests robustness in associations between ER, sleep and later anxiety. Results from the present study could inform intervention opportunities which teach emotion regulation and sleep hygiene skills to children to prevent future acquisition of anxious symptoms.
Advised by: Dr. Susan Keane
Social SciencesTaraLesickPsychologyDr.EthanZellRace-Ethnicity and the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effecthttps://youtu.be/2o3SmnTbEN0Research on the big-fish-little-pond effect has found that students with high rank in a low rank school have more favorable academic self-concepts than students with low rank in a high rank school. This effect has been primarily studied in school settings, making it unknown whether the effect generalizes to a racial-ethnic context. The current research had White and Black participants (N = 107, 106) complete a test and receive feedback indicating that they performed well in a racial group that performed poorly or performed poorly in a racial group that performed well. Because African Americans identify more strongly with their racial group than European Americans, we hypothesized that a significant big-fish-little-pond effect would only occur among White participants. However, results illustrated a significant big-fish-little-pond effect for both White and Black participants. These results suggest that the big-fish-little-pond effect extends to a racial-ethnic context for both European Americans and African Americans., IRB# 20-0460Tara Lesick
Psychology
In collaboration with: Dr. Ethan Zell
Race-Ethnicity and the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect

Research on the big-fish-little-pond effect has found that students with high rank in a low rank school have more favorable academic self-concepts than students with low rank in a high rank school. This effect has been primarily studied in school settings, making it unknown whether the effect generalizes to a racial-ethnic context. The current research had White and Black participants (N = 107, 106) complete a test and receive feedback indicating that they performed well in a racial group that performed poorly or performed poorly in a racial group that performed well. Because African Americans identify more strongly with their racial group than European Americans, we hypothesized that a significant big-fish-little-pond effect would only occur among White participants. However, results illustrated a significant big-fish-little-pond effect for both White and Black participants. These results suggest that the big-fish-little-pond effect extends to a racial-ethnic context for both European Americans and African Americans.
Advised by: Dr. Ethan Zell
Social SciencesBrianMaurerPsychologyDr.Shaylene ENancekivellHave it? Share it?: How parents reason about children's conflictshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6h0nvzj7qU“It’s mine!” and “But I want to play with it!” are words that are probably heard often if you are a parent. Children are constantly arguing with each other over their possessions. Parents play an important role in helping them resolve these conflicts. Though these conflicts can seem insignificant, the choices parents make can have a lasting effect on their children’s values and beliefs. For example, encouraging children to share can promote prosociality like kindness, whereas siding with owners promotes a child’s understanding of owners’ rights. This project explores how the features of children's conflicts influence parent's decision-making about them. We specifically used a survey method to explore how the identity of children (siblings or neighbors) affects parents’ reasoning. This exploration has an impact for scientific discussions of parenting, sharing, ownership, and prosocial development., IRB# 20-0044Brian Maurer
Psychology
In collaboration with: Dr. Shaylene E Nancekivell
Have it? Share it?: How parents reason about children's conflicts

“It’s mine!” and “But I want to play with it!” are words that are probably heard often if you are a parent. Children are constantly arguing with each other over their possessions. Parents play an important role in helping them resolve these conflicts. Though these conflicts can seem insignificant, the choices parents make can have a lasting effect on their children’s values and beliefs. For example, encouraging children to share can promote prosociality like kindness, whereas siding with owners promotes a child’s understanding of owners’ rights. This project explores how the features of children's conflicts influence parent's decision-making about them. We specifically used a survey method to explore how the identity of children (siblings or neighbors) affects parents’ reasoning. This exploration has an impact for scientific discussions of parenting, sharing, ownership, and prosocial development.
Advised by: Dr. Shaylene E Nancekivell
Social SciencesImaniMitchellHuman Development and Family StudiesDr.SudhaShreeniwasKierra SattlerExamining Adverse Childhood Experiences and Resilience Among Black and Hispanic Childrenhttps://youtu.be/zrkbunygNH4Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) refers to any abuse or potentially traumatic event that happen to a person under the age of eighteen. Minority youth disproportionately experience higher rates of ACEs than their non-minority peers. Resilience or protective factors are what enable these individuals to develop healthy behaviors and lowers the prevalence of negative outcomes. This study uses a subset of data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K) 2010-2011 to examine how ACEs that occur in kindergarten influence depressive symptoms in fifth grade for Black, Hispanic, and White youth. Summary statistics and regression analysis are used to examine the prevalence of different types of ACEs, how ACEs influence depressive symptoms, and if resilience acts as a protective factor. The results of the study indicate that ACEs are more prevalent among Black and Hispanic youth and resilience acts as a protective factor., IRB# 127262Imani Mitchell
Human Development and Family Studies
In collaboration with: Kierra Sattler, Dr. Sudha Shreeniwas
Examining Adverse Childhood Experiences and Resilience Among Black and Hispanic Children

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) refers to any abuse or potentially traumatic event that happen to a person under the age of eighteen. Minority youth disproportionately experience higher rates of ACEs than their non-minority peers. Resilience or protective factors are what enable these individuals to develop healthy behaviors and lowers the prevalence of negative outcomes. This study uses a subset of data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K) 2010-2011 to examine how ACEs that occur in kindergarten influence depressive symptoms in fifth grade for Black, Hispanic, and White youth. Summary statistics and regression analysis are used to examine the prevalence of different types of ACEs, how ACEs influence depressive symptoms, and if resilience acts as a protective factor. The results of the study indicate that ACEs are more prevalent among Black and Hispanic youth and resilience acts as a protective factor.
Advised by: Dr. Sudha Shreeniwas
Social SciencesJ.R.MollerEducational Research MethodologyDr.AyeshaBoyceNavigating Theory to Practice through Case-based Learning: The Future of Graduate Evaluation Educationhttps://youtu.be/RJa5RvRspqgEvaluation continues to increase in importance in society. Evaluation graduate students need a stronger and more tangible tie-in between evaluation theory and practice prior to graduating and entering the practice arena. This tie-in can be created by establishing a case-based learning curriculum for evaluation students where they have a safe space to put evaluation theories into practice via the cases. A case-based course would provide an “in-vitro/in-vivo” means of working through evaluations without posing risk to stakeholders. Case-based learning is a common practice in health sciences education where the stakes are high. An evaluation focused case-based learning course would allow the further cultivation of competencies from all five Evaluator Competency domains in graduate student evaluators (AEA, 2018). Additionally, it would allow teachers/professors to “Keep it Real” while giving evaluation students greater exposure to a variety of critical evaluation forums such a policy, education, and programs without posing risk to stakeholders.J.R. Moller
Educational Research Methodology
In collaboration with: Dr. Ayesha Boyce
Navigating Theory to Practice through Case-based Learning: The Future of Graduate Evaluation Education

Evaluation continues to increase in importance in society. Evaluation graduate students need a stronger and more tangible tie-in between evaluation theory and practice prior to graduating and entering the practice arena. This tie-in can be created by establishing a case-based learning curriculum for evaluation students where they have a safe space to put evaluation theories into practice via the cases. A case-based course would provide an “in-vitro/in-vivo” means of working through evaluations without posing risk to stakeholders. Case-based learning is a common practice in health sciences education where the stakes are high. An evaluation focused case-based learning course would allow the further cultivation of competencies from all five Evaluator Competency domains in graduate student evaluators (AEA, 2018). Additionally, it would allow teachers/professors to “Keep it Real” while giving evaluation students greater exposure to a variety of critical evaluation forums such a policy, education, and programs without posing risk to stakeholders.
Advised by: Dr. Ayesha Boyce
Social SciencesJessicaNavarroHuman Development and Family StudiesDr.JonathanTudgeParenting in the Digital Age: Development of a Measure to Assess Parental Mediation Strategieshttps://youtu.be/ZxiAPkcN1dcInformation communication technology (ICT) has revolutionized the way families communicate, socialize, work, and play. Family scientists are beginning to examine how families can best be supported in the face of this sweeping social change. This study hopes to bolster this area of inquiry through the development of a quantitative measure of parental mediation of ICT. Drawing from theory and qualitative focus group data, a 69-item measure with seven hypothesized sub-dimensions was piloted using participants (N=496) recruited from an online participant-sourcing platform. However, analyses reduced these dimensions to a five-factor model of parental mediation: active mediation, restrictive mediation, co-use, technological agency and education, and modelling. Additional analyses with demographic predictors, related parenting measures, family conflict, and technological competence are forthcoming., IRB# 20-0099Jessica Navarro
Human Development and Family Studies
In collaboration with: Dr. Jonathan Tudge
Parenting in the Digital Age: Development of a Measure to Assess Parental Mediation Strategies

Information communication technology (ICT) has revolutionized the way families communicate, socialize, work, and play. Family scientists are beginning to examine how families can best be supported in the face of this sweeping social change. This study hopes to bolster this area of inquiry through the development of a quantitative measure of parental mediation of ICT. Drawing from theory and qualitative focus group data, a 69-item measure with seven hypothesized sub-dimensions was piloted using participants (N=496) recruited from an online participant-sourcing platform. However, analyses reduced these dimensions to a five-factor model of parental mediation: active mediation, restrictive mediation, co-use, technological agency and education, and modelling. Additional analyses with demographic predictors, related parenting measures, family conflict, and technological competence are forthcoming.
Advised by: Dr. Jonathan Tudge
Social SciencesMerveOzdemirSpecialized Education ServicesDr.HeatherColemanSolving a Wicked Problem: Who is Lacking Emotional Skills?https://youtu.be/uf5FS8ZCkmQOften individuals with Autism are put on a stand that they are lacking emotional face recognition skills as well as showing their emotions. Yet, deficits in social-emotional skills are one of the diagnosis criteria. Autism research spent a tremendous amount of time thinking about how to improve the emotional skills of individuals with autism. However, Autism research is now turning away from a focus on a lack of emotion recognition skills in autistic individuals and orienting toward the view that emotion processing depends on common representations of emotions between interaction partners. During this presentation, we challenge ourselves to switch the lenses to better understand the people’s way of communicating by investigating the differences in pursuing and processing the emotion.Merve Ozdemir
Specialized Education Services
In collaboration with: Dr. Heather Coleman
Solving a Wicked Problem: Who is Lacking Emotional Skills?

Often individuals with Autism are put on a stand that they are lacking emotional face recognition skills as well as showing their emotions. Yet, deficits in social-emotional skills are one of the diagnosis criteria. Autism research spent a tremendous amount of time thinking about how to improve the emotional skills of individuals with autism. However, Autism research is now turning away from a focus on a lack of emotion recognition skills in autistic individuals and orienting toward the view that emotion processing depends on common representations of emotions between interaction partners. During this presentation, we challenge ourselves to switch the lenses to better understand the people’s way of communicating by investigating the differences in pursuing and processing the emotion.
Advised by: Dr. Heather Coleman
Social SciencesRebekahRodriguezPsychologyDr.PaulSilviaMartin BoerwinkleQualitative Validation of a Novel Virtual Gallery Systemhttps://youtu.be/wBWDqQbNyn8Research on the psychology of art has found many links between the way people view and engage with art in-person and their artistic knowledge, backgrounds, and individual differences. However, measuring art-viewing in settings like museums and galleries has proven time-consuming, costly, and even prohibited during times of social distancing. To combat this, we created a virtual art gallery simulation to conduct research comparable to in-person work on arts experiences. In this project, we demonstrated that our virtual gallery can be sufficiently generalized to real-life museums and discuss plans for studying how viewing behavior in the virtual gallery relates to common predictors of engagement. Developing virtual alternatives to traditional in-person field research in the arts has the potential to make both basic research and applied assessments of art engagement (e.g., by people working in visitor studies, art education, and museum curation) more affordable, accessible, and safer during public health crises., IRB# 21-0311Rebekah Rodriguez
Psychology
In collaboration with: Martin Boerwinkle, Dr. Paul Silvia
Qualitative Validation of a Novel Virtual Gallery System

Research on the psychology of art has found many links between the way people view and engage with art in-person and their artistic knowledge, backgrounds, and individual differences. However, measuring art-viewing in settings like museums and galleries has proven time-consuming, costly, and even prohibited during times of social distancing. To combat this, we created a virtual art gallery simulation to conduct research comparable to in-person work on arts experiences. In this project, we demonstrated that our virtual gallery can be sufficiently generalized to real-life museums and discuss plans for studying how viewing behavior in the virtual gallery relates to common predictors of engagement. Developing virtual alternatives to traditional in-person field research in the arts has the potential to make both basic research and applied assessments of art engagement (e.g., by people working in visitor studies, art education, and museum curation) more affordable, accessible, and safer during public health crises.
Advised by: Dr. Paul Silvia
Social SciencesSageRufsvoldCommunication StudiesDr.MarianneLeGrecoSocial Media's Influence: Public Reactions to Body Positivity and Diet Culturehttps://youtu.be/X5U9UZPBMJAAs print media fades out and social media becomes the main source of information for many age groups, there is an ethical obligation to learn the influences that an individual can have on viewers of their content. By analyzing publicly available comments across several influencers' pages, I aim to discover the patterns of content that aid or hinder positive self-image.Sage Rufsvold
Communication Studies
In collaboration with: Dr. Marianne LeGreco
Social Media's Influence: Public Reactions to Body Positivity and Diet Culture

As print media fades out and social media becomes the main source of information for many age groups, there is an ethical obligation to learn the influences that an individual can have on viewers of their content. By analyzing publicly available comments across several influencers' pages, I aim to discover the patterns of content that aid or hinder positive self-image.
Advised by: Dr. Marianne LeGreco
Social SciencesFatima EzzahraSalmiPublic Health EducationDr.Sharon D.MorrisonAssessing the Natural Helper approach to Greensboro's Bhutanese community COVID-19 challengeshttps://youtu.be/ysxD0LPnYJEThe Natural Helper Approach is one where a lay community person or lay workers who understand community dynamics, are able to easily intervene in crisis by leveraging networks and locating and deploying resources. When members of Greensboro's Bhutanese community became occupationally exposed COVID-19, this increased disease vulnerability and compromised survival strategies among its multigenerational households. Through use of ethnographic field methods (participant observation, informal conversation and photography), I gathered information about the Natural Helper approach being used in response to COVID-19 challenges. This yielded two main outcomes: instrumental support (funding for PPE and food supplies) and informational support (using social media to address stigma and provide COVID-19 prevention education). These have important implications for understanding community-centered interventions in crisis situations and for longer term community health outcomes.Fatima Ezzahra Salmi
Public Health Education
In collaboration with: Dr. Sharon D. Morrison
Assessing the Natural Helper approach to Greensboro's Bhutanese community COVID-19 challenges

The Natural Helper Approach is one where a lay community person or lay workers who understand community dynamics, are able to easily intervene in crisis by leveraging networks and locating and deploying resources. When members of Greensboro's Bhutanese community became occupationally exposed COVID-19, this increased disease vulnerability and compromised survival strategies among its multigenerational households. Through use of ethnographic field methods (participant observation, informal conversation and photography), I gathered information about the Natural Helper approach being used in response to COVID-19 challenges. This yielded two main outcomes: instrumental support (funding for PPE and food supplies) and informational support (using social media to address stigma and provide COVID-19 prevention education). These have important implications for understanding community-centered interventions in crisis situations and for longer term community health outcomes.
Advised by: Dr. Sharon D. Morrison
Social SciencesMd Rashedur RahmanSardarEconomicsDr.AlbertLinkInnovation Activity in Developing Countrieshttps://youtu.be/bPRi8_xx0YAWhile innovation is crucial for the economic growth and development of a country and for stimulating the productivity of firms, investment in R&D is considered as the most influential variable of a firm’s ability to innovate. Many studies of firms in developed countries have verified the R&D to innovation relationship, however, there is a void in the literature of innovation studies that focus on developing countries. This study has explored and compared the R&D relationship among firms and analyzed the small firm behavior of a few developing countries of South Asia. The study finds the resource-based factors and firm’s characteristics have a consistent evidence of effect on firm’s innovation. R&D activities contribute highly and significantly for innovation compare to any other variables. Access to finance is the second most contributor of innovation after R&D in this study. Size also plays a significant role on innovation activities of the firms.Md Rashedur Rahman Sardar
Economics
In collaboration with: Dr. Albert Link
Innovation Activity in Developing Countries

While innovation is crucial for the economic growth and development of a country and for stimulating the productivity of firms, investment in R&D is considered as the most influential variable of a firm’s ability to innovate. Many studies of firms in developed countries have verified the R&D to innovation relationship, however, there is a void in the literature of innovation studies that focus on developing countries. This study has explored and compared the R&D relationship among firms and analyzed the small firm behavior of a few developing countries of South Asia. The study finds the resource-based factors and firm’s characteristics have a consistent evidence of effect on firm’s innovation. R&D activities contribute highly and significantly for innovation compare to any other variables. Access to finance is the second most contributor of innovation after R&D in this study. Size also plays a significant role on innovation activities of the firms.
Advised by: Dr. Albert Link
Social SciencesJordanSasielaPsychologyDr.KariEddingtonKnowing When to Quit: The Role of Depression and Attainability in Giving Uphttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-25Ch7ZDlAA growing body of work suggests that depression may lead people to give up on their goals prematurely. However, the reasons as to why remain unclear. One explanation is that people with depression think differently about goals, viewing them as less attainable and as result give up sooner. As such, this study examined the role that attainability and importance play in tendencies to give up. Ultimately, there was not direct evidence that higher levels of depression lead to giving up because of a drop in attainability. However, it was found that individuals with greater depressive symptoms viewed the task as less attainable, on average, and that declines in attainability predicted subsequent giving up on a computer task. These findings suggest that how people view their goals may indeed be altered by conditions like depression and ultimately influence behaviors related to goals., IRB# 18-0308Jordan Sasiela
Psychology
In collaboration with: Dr. Kari Eddington
Knowing When to Quit: The Role of Depression and Attainability in Giving Up

A growing body of work suggests that depression may lead people to give up on their goals prematurely. However, the reasons as to why remain unclear. One explanation is that people with depression think differently about goals, viewing them as less attainable and as result give up sooner. As such, this study examined the role that attainability and importance play in tendencies to give up. Ultimately, there was not direct evidence that higher levels of depression lead to giving up because of a drop in attainability. However, it was found that individuals with greater depressive symptoms viewed the task as less attainable, on average, and that declines in attainability predicted subsequent giving up on a computer task. These findings suggest that how people view their goals may indeed be altered by conditions like depression and ultimately influence behaviors related to goals.
Advised by: Dr. Kari Eddington
Social SciencesUmaSwamyConsumer, Apparel, and Retail StudiesDr.TuWatchravesringkan6 Months of Covid-19 – A Comparative Analysis of Grocery Shopping Behavior of Consumershttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W80haX3H-44The Covid-19 pandemic severely impacted individuals and businesses worldwide. To mitigate the spread, many individuals’ movement were restricted and many businesses shuttered, but grocery stores were deemed essential services and allowed to operate. The Covid-19 pandemic impacted consumers psychologically and triggered panic buying in the initial stages and then altered consumer buying behavior as they adapted to restrictions. This study analyzes real time transaction level grocery stores data in Alberta and confirms changes in consumer buying behavior with reference to sales volumes, product categories, shopping trips and basket sizes in different store size formats. This is a longitudinal study comparing the consumer shopping metrics over 6 month and discusses implications for businesses and managers.Uma Swamy
Consumer, Apparel, and Retail Studies
In collaboration with: Dr. Tu Watchravesringkan
6 Months of Covid-19 – A Comparative Analysis of Grocery Shopping Behavior of Consumers

The Covid-19 pandemic severely impacted individuals and businesses worldwide. To mitigate the spread, many individuals’ movement were restricted and many businesses shuttered, but grocery stores were deemed essential services and allowed to operate. The Covid-19 pandemic impacted consumers psychologically and triggered panic buying in the initial stages and then altered consumer buying behavior as they adapted to restrictions. This study analyzes real time transaction level grocery stores data in Alberta and confirms changes in consumer buying behavior with reference to sales volumes, product categories, shopping trips and basket sizes in different store size formats. This is a longitudinal study comparing the consumer shopping metrics over 6 month and discusses implications for businesses and managers.
Advised by: Dr. Tu Watchravesringkan
Social SciencesIndyaWalkerHuman Development and Family StudiesDr.Jocelyn R.Smith LeeInsiders as Experts: Centering Community Perspectives on Impact of Community Violence for Black Males and Families in Greensborohttps://youtu.be/ucM8hn4Od4cCommunity violence is a threat to the lives of young Black males in Greensboro. Black males disproportionately represent the majority of homicide victims and with record homicide rates continuing to rise in Greensboro since 2017, assessing the traumatic impact of community violence on Black male youth, young men, and their families within the city is paramount. Considering the vulnerability of young Black boys, men, and families, this project employed the four-phased Assessment-Oriented Community Diagnosis (AOCD) approach to gauge the climate and dynamics of the Greensboro community around community violence. Centering the voices and perspectives of community stakeholders, Black youth, and families, the researchers allowed the community to serve as experiential experts on the causes, impact, prevention, and healing of community violence. The unique application of the AOCD model for assessing the aftermath of homicide has the potential to serve as an effective blueprint for other Community-Based Participatory Research., IRB# 19-0528Indya Walker
Human Development and Family Studies
In collaboration with: Dr. Jocelyn R. Smith Lee
Insiders as Experts: Centering Community Perspectives on Impact of Community Violence for Black Males and Families in Greensboro

Community violence is a threat to the lives of young Black males in Greensboro. Black males disproportionately represent the majority of homicide victims and with record homicide rates continuing to rise in Greensboro since 2017, assessing the traumatic impact of community violence on Black male youth, young men, and their families within the city is paramount. Considering the vulnerability of young Black boys, men, and families, this project employed the four-phased Assessment-Oriented Community Diagnosis (AOCD) approach to gauge the climate and dynamics of the Greensboro community around community violence. Centering the voices and perspectives of community stakeholders, Black youth, and families, the researchers allowed the community to serve as experiential experts on the causes, impact, prevention, and healing of community violence. The unique application of the AOCD model for assessing the aftermath of homicide has the potential to serve as an effective blueprint for other Community-Based Participatory Research.
Advised by: Dr. Jocelyn R. Smith Lee
Social SciencesKeadijaWileyHuman Development and Family StudiesDr.StephanieCoardWhat are Black Parents (actually) saying? Black Parents’ Observed Racial Socialization Behaviorshttps://youtu.be/Abu2xwF6hvIAs families navigate a racialized society, Black parents often engage in racial-ethnic socialization (RES) to prepare their children for and protect against the negative racial encounters that they will likely experience. RES is the process by which parents transmit messages about race, racial pride, racial discrimination and how to cope with those encounters in a racially conscious society (Coard & Sellars, 2005). The RES literature provides needed guidance on how parents engage in this critically important albeit difficult didactic process. Few studies have targeted parents of younger children and even fewer have utilized observational methods as opposed to parent reports. This study highlights how parents engage in RES and instill racial coping strategies with their young child(ren) via use of observational methodology. This study provides needed insight into the observed use of RES with young children and informs the design of developmentally appropriate programming to support parents.Keadija Wiley
Human Development and Family Studies
In collaboration with: Dr. Stephanie Coard
What are Black Parents (actually) saying? Black Parents’ Observed Racial Socialization Behaviors

As families navigate a racialized society, Black parents often engage in racial-ethnic socialization (RES) to prepare their children for and protect against the negative racial encounters that they will likely experience. RES is the process by which parents transmit messages about race, racial pride, racial discrimination and how to cope with those encounters in a racially conscious society (Coard & Sellars, 2005). The RES literature provides needed guidance on how parents engage in this critically important albeit difficult didactic process. Few studies have targeted parents of younger children and even fewer have utilized observational methods as opposed to parent reports. This study highlights how parents engage in RES and instill racial coping strategies with their young child(ren) via use of observational methodology. This study provides needed insight into the observed use of RES with young children and informs the design of developmentally appropriate programming to support parents.
Advised by: Dr. Stephanie Coard
Social SciencesAnnieWilliamsConsumer, Apparel, and Retail StudiesDr.TuWatchravesringkan & Dr. Nancy HodgesThe effects of green marketing on the purchase intention of sustainable goods: A meta-analysishttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecazYeQGNNgThis study utilized a meta-analytic approach to determine the effectiveness of green advertising on consumer’s purchase intention of green advertised goods. Seven original studies met the requirements for inclusion in this study, and after coding for moderators, were entered as a total of 21 sub studies. Analysis determined that the use of green advertising does positively influence consumer’s purchase intention of green advertised products and factors such as whether the ad is theory based, uses a branded product, the level of product involvement, the appeal and greenness of the ad moderate the effect of green advertising on purchase intention.Annie Williams
Consumer, Apparel, and Retail Studies
In collaboration with: Dr. Tu Watchravesringkan & Dr. Nancy Hodges
The effects of green marketing on the purchase intention of sustainable goods: A meta-analysis

This study utilized a meta-analytic approach to determine the effectiveness of green advertising on consumer’s purchase intention of green advertised goods. Seven original studies met the requirements for inclusion in this study, and after coding for moderators, were entered as a total of 21 sub studies. Analysis determined that the use of green advertising does positively influence consumer’s purchase intention of green advertised products and factors such as whether the ad is theory based, uses a branded product, the level of product involvement, the appeal and greenness of the ad moderate the effect of green advertising on purchase intention.
Advised by: Dr. Tu Watchravesringkan & Dr. Nancy Hodges

This online event is a showcase of UNCG graduate students’ accomplishments to the Greater Greensboro community. It is a means for students to use brief videos to communicate their research and creative activities with the public in jargon-free language.

Creating these videos prepares students to deliver “elevator pitches” on their research. It can serve as an advertisement for students’ scholarship, either as a “video abstract” associated with an ETD submission in ProQuest or as a department or University outreach feature.

The online Showcase is open to any currently enrolled UNCG graduate student engaged in original scholarship with a UNCG faculty member. A $50* participation award will be given to each valid video submission, and each video will be eligible to win one of a minimum of ten $500* category awards (based on 100 submissions). The total number and distribution of the category awards will depend on the total number of submissions. Submissions are limited to one per student, regardless of their role in a project.

* Awards are posted to students’ accounts and may impact financial aid.

Students should plan to present their work in a way that is accessible to diverse audiences and explains in jargon-free language the importance and relevance of their work. Students should make their presentations appropriate for Middle College students, undergraduates, journalists, community members, area business owners, representatives from boards and foundations, state legislators, or neighbors down the street.

Submitted videos may make use of still shots, video, slides, animations, or anything else that is appropriate to best convey the research/creative work and its impact.

See the following guide to preparing your Showcase video.

*Please Note: We will automatically accept the first 100 entries, pending confirmation from their Faculty Mentor. Students who register after 100 poster registrations are received will be placed on a waiting list and notified of their participation status within one week of registration closing.

Registered participants must submit a single 4-6 minute YouTube video via the Submission Form by noon March 24, 2021. Students will have the opportunity to provide any updates to their project title or abstract when submitting their video.

Requirements for the video:

  • Students should briefly explain their scholarship and its impact to a general audience.
  • Videos may make use of still shots, video, slides, animations, or anything else that is appropriate to best convey the research/creative work and its impact.
  • Students do not need to appear on video, but their contribution to the project should be clear.
  • Students should post their video on their UNCG-affiliated YouTube space, and the video set to be publicly available.
  • The video must be captioned.
  • The video must persist and be viewable through May 15, 2021.
  • Since disclosure through any sort of publication could jeopardize any patenting opportunities and limit an innovation’s value, students should communicate with their advisors regarding the videos’ content.
  • The Digital ACT Studio provides tips on Selecting Filming Environments.

The Showcase of Scholarship is organized in the following poster topics:

  • Arts
  • Health Sciences
  • Humanities
  • Natural, Physical, and Mathematical Sciences
  • Professional Programs
  • Social Sciences

(The Graduate School reserves the right to modify categories to promote equity and facilitate judging.)

AWARDS:

In recognition of the effort required to create a video presentation for the online celebration of scholarship, each valid submission will be provided a $50* award for participation and is eligible to win one of a minimum of ten $500* category (based on 100 submissions). The total number and distribution of the category awards will depend on the total number of submissions. Submissions are limited to one per student, regardless of their role in a project.

*These awards are not given as cash; they will be posted to each student’s account and may impact financial aid. Students are encouraged to check with that office for details. Students with a current balance due will see the award pay that balance first; any funds that remain will be issued as a refund check.

Registration is limited to 100 video entries.

When registering, students will:

  • Provide their information and program of study.
  • Enter their title, coauthor(s), and UNCG faculty mentor information. The faculty mentor will be contacted to authorize participation in the Showcase.
  • Select the area in which their work should be considered:
    • Arts
    • Health Sciences
    • Humanities
    • Natural, Physical, and Mathematical Sciences
    • Professional Programs
    • Social Sciences
  • Write an abstract (150 words or less) for the Showcase website that specifically addresses:
    • What question is being answered, or what issue is being addressed?
    • Why does the scholarship matter?
    • Why should people care about it?
    • Where does this work fit into the ongoing conversation on this topic?

Students who know or suspect that they may have some intellectual property that needs assessment for patent or copyright significance must contact their faculty advisor before submitting for Showcase.

In addition, research performed via sponsored agreements may have clauses that restrict publication or ownership implication. Students should check with their faculty advisor or the Office of Research and Engagement for information.

  • Clarity of Communication to a Non-Specialized Audience
    • Students should provide information in a way people outside the field can understand
  • Effective Presentation Skills
  • Content Knowledge and Creativity
  • Organization
  • Originality
  • Ability to explain importance of the work (e.g., economic impact, societal impact, scholarly impact). Students should think about:
    • What question is being answered, or what issue is being addressed?
    • Why does the scholarship matter?
    • Why should people care about it?
    • Where does this work fit into the ongoing conversation on this topic?

See the following guide to preparing your Showcase video.

 

The Digital ACT Studio
Want help designing a presentation? The Digital ACT Studio can assist with the effectiveness of a production. The Studio can provide feedback on effectively reaching an audience and if a student’s project is rhetorically and aesthetically compelling.

Our consultants are professionally trained to help create stronger, rhetorically, and aesthetically effective projects. By engaging in one-on-one conversations, we focus on shared knowledge and expertise. At the Digital ACT Studio, students can receive feedback on creating appropriate, pedagogically effective presentations.

The Digital ACT Studio is typically open Monday-Thursday 10 am-8 pm, and Friday 10 am-2 pm or go online to schedule a 30 minute or 1-hour appointment today!
For more information, visit: digitalactstudio.uncg.edu. Contact us at: digitalACTS@uncg.edu

The Digital Media Commons
The Digital Media Commons can help students with their technology needs! Visit online for assistance with questions about multimedia technology. Students can also make an appointment with staff if they have questions concerning images that can be used on presentations or if they are new to creating such presentations. Contact us: libdmc@uncg.edu or visit our website: library.uncg.edu/spaces/dmc/

The University Speaking Center
The University Speaking Center provides consultation support and instructional workshop services for UNCG students, faculty, employees, and Greensboro community members. The Center’s support is designed to help speakers further develop their oral communication confidence and competence. We provide peer-to-peer feedback, guidance, and other support in public speaking preparation and delivery, interpersonal communication, and group or team communication. For more information, please visit: speakingcenter.uncg.edu

February 17 Registration for the Showcase will close at noon or sooner. Registration is limited to 100 submissions.
March 24 Showcase participants must submit a link to a UNCG-affiliated YouTube video that is captioned and 4-6 minutes in length via the Submission Form by noon.

 

Due to the uncertain times of COVID-19, dates are subject to change.

For any questions about the information presented above, contact Laura Drew at Ladrew@uncg.edu.